Kate Taney Billingsley grew up struggling with her family history. Her ancestor Roger B. Taney was the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the Dred Scott decision, issued March 6, 1857, that ruled Congress could not regulate slavery and that blacks could not be considered U.S. citizens. She grew up hearing relatives debate a thorny question: Should the family apologize to Scott's descendants for the decision? "What do you do with that kind of generational guilt?" she ask...

Kate Taney Billingsley grew up struggling with her family history. Her ancestor Roger B. Taney was the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who wrote the Dred Scott decision, issued March 6, 1857, that ruled Congress could not regulate slavery and that blacks could not be considered U.S. citizens. She grew up hearing relatives debate a thorny question: Should the family apologize to Scott's descendants for the decision? "What do you do with that kind of generational guilt?" she ask...

Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, holding that office from 1836 until his death in 1864. He was the first Roman Catholic to hold that office or sit on the Supreme Court of the United States. He was also the eleventh United States Attorney General.

Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, holding that office from 1836 until his death in 1864. He was the first Roman Catholic to hold that office or sit on the Supreme Court of the United States. He was also the eleventh United States Attorney General.

Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, nearly 84, administered the oath of office to Lincoln for his first term.

Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, nearly 84, administered the oath of office to Lincoln for his first term.

On Monday in Annapolis, descendants of former Supreme Court chief justice Roger B. Taney apologize to a descendant of Dred Scott, initiating what both families hope will be a long-term campaign of racial reconciliation in America.

On Monday in Annapolis, descendants of former Supreme Court chief justice Roger B. Taney apologize to a descendant of Dred Scott, initiating what both families hope will be a long-term campaign of racial reconciliation in America.

The descendants of Dred Scott and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney meet - Pete Taney knew this day would come. “I’ve been looking over my shoulders all of my life, so this is no surprise,” said Taney, the lead vocalist, banjo, fiddle and harmonica player for the popular ...

The descendants of Dred Scott and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney meet - Pete Taney knew this day would come. “I’ve been looking over my shoulders all of my life, so this is no surprise,” said Taney, the lead vocalist, banjo, fiddle and harmonica player for the popular ...

Roger B. Taney quotes quotations and aphorisms from OpenQuotes #quotes #quotations #aphorisms #openquotes #citation

Roger B. Taney quotes quotations and aphorisms from OpenQuotes #quotes #quotations #aphorisms #openquotes #citation

The bust of Roger B. Taney being removed from the front of the Court House  by Badkins55 qa5a6933.jpg (4413×3262)

The bust of Roger B. Taney being removed from the front of the Court House by Badkins55 qa5a6933.jpg (4413×3262)

Part II. Dred Scott Decision, 1857. Pursuing the ruling further, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney (1777-1864) declared that even if Scott had been accorded the right to sue, the mere fact that he had lived for a brief time in free territory did not make him a free man, this according to the Fifth Amendment; no one could be deprived of their property without due process. Therefore, the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional, and Taney denied Congress had the power to ban slavery in any…

Part II. Dred Scott Decision, 1857. Pursuing the ruling further, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney (1777-1864) declared that even if Scott had been accorded the right to sue, the mere fact that he had lived for a brief time in free territory did not make him a free man, this according to the Fifth Amendment; no one could be deprived of their property without due process. Therefore, the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional, and Taney denied Congress had the power to ban slavery in any…

Roger B. Taney - Brady-Handy.jpg Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court in the Dred Scott V. Sanford case (The Dred Scott Decision)

Roger B. Taney - Brady-Handy.jpg Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court in the Dred Scott V. Sanford case (The Dred Scott Decision)

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