Rhythm in art

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The multiple faces with different emotions all suggest mental disorders such as multiple personalities, bipolar of schizophrenia. This works well with my theme of humans, emotions and mental issues

Peter Jansen. sculpture (running) - This 3D piece is also 4D in that it repeats an image over time.

Moving artwork: the kinetic sculptures of Peter Jansen

Runner (Human Emotions), 2007 by Peter Jansen on Curiator, the world's biggest collaborative art collection.

This design shows continuity which is why I think it's a good example of rhythm. #RUDesign

This rhythm design shows the colorful lines are curving to the rhythmic direction. This is an example of progressive rhythm.

We are born into bodies that are fluid and free...Rhythm, breath, music and movement become tools of seeing and then freeing the habits that hold us back. When we move our bodies then our hearts begin to open, when the body and the heart taste freedom the mind won't be far behind. ~Gabrielle Roth

This time we chose to present to you one very talented photographer – Mariya. Mariya takes photos in a unique way. He combines artistic tone with a perfect angle when he takes photographs of women body. Those photographs are not distasteful at all,.

texture- this shows texture by making the sand in big bulges. it also could be seen as ripples through water flowing into the middle of the artwork. it also gives a bit of movement into the center.

Sand Waves - Rdgelike primary structure resembling a water wave on the upper surface of a sedimentary bed. It's formation by air brings to the surface an integral work of art.

Sketchbook drawing and painting exercises from the Sketchbook Explorations course at Creative Bug. Drawings by Kate Hadfield.

Sketchbook Explorations

Sketchbook exercises and art journal pages inspired by Lisa Congdon’s Sketchbook Explorations course -this is a really fun course to jump-start your creativity!

Je ziet een mannetje die horizontale lijnen heeft stappen uit de verticale lijnen

Je ziet een mannetje die horizontale lijnen heeft stappen uit de verticale lijnen This piece shows a progressive rhythm because the horizontal lines cause the viewers eyes to see the shape of a man surrounded by vertical lines.

Credit: Walker Art Gallery/Bridget Riley's own collection Study for Shuttle (1964)

Flashback: Bridget Riley at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool

Credit: Walker Art Gallery/Bridget Riley's own collection Study for Shuttle (1964)

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