This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera, which is capable of exposure times as brief as 10 nanoseconds (one nanosecond is one billionth of a second).

This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera, which is capable of exposure times as brief as 10 nanoseconds (one nanosecond is one billionth of a second).

This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera. the photograph was shot from roughly 7 miles away during the Tumbler-Snapper tests in Nevada (1952)

This might look like some kind of microscopic organism, but it’s actually a high-speed photograph of a nuclear explosion. It was captured less than 1 millisecond after the detonation using a rapatronic camera. the photograph was shot from roughly 7 miles away during the Tumbler-Snapper tests in Nevada (1952)

heart 1
Photographs of early atomic experiments taken by Harold Edgerton with his rapatronic camera. Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Musuem of Am...

Photographs of early atomic experiments taken by Harold Edgerton with his rapatronic camera. Courtesy of Smithsonian's National Musuem of Am...

pin 2
High-speed rapatronic camera, manufactured by Edgerton, Germeshausen and Grier Inc. Boston. Took the first pictures of nuclear explosions.

High-speed rapatronic camera, manufactured by Edgerton, Germeshausen and Grier Inc. Boston. Took the first pictures of nuclear explosions.

Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search