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A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit. Warning: Some of the... More

40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

A moving collection of iconic photographs from the last 100 years that demonstrate the heartbreak of loss, the tremendous power of loyalty, and the triumph of the human spirit. Warning: Some of the... More

Peter Rabbit - the most popular creation of Beatrix Potter, introduced in 'The Tale of Peter Rabbit', 1902. When she met Norman Warne, Potter was a 35 year old spinster. She had firm ideas about how she wanted her book to look, insisting it be small enough for little hands, that text and illustrations be on separate pages, and that the price be low.

Digital Illustration, Beatrix Potter Peter Rabbit, Instant Download, Decoupage, Nursery Decor, Baby Shower, Scrapbook, Art JPG and PDF file

Peter Rabbit - the most popular creation of Beatrix Potter, introduced in 'The Tale of Peter Rabbit', 1902. When she met Norman Warne, Potter was a 35 year old spinster. She had firm ideas about how she wanted her book to look, insisting it be small enough for little hands, that text and illustrations be on separate pages, and that the price be low.

En 2006, Peter Norman décède finalement à Melbourne, en Australie. Pendant des décennies, il a a donc été pour beaucoup "l'homme qui n'a pas levé le poing" tout en étant complètement déconsidéré par son propre pays puis, pire encore, oublié.    À son décès, les deux sprinteurs américains ont tenu à porter son cercueil

Personne ou presque ne fait attention à lui, l'homme qui ne lève pas le poing sur cette photo mythique. Et pourtant... C'est peut être bien lui le plus grand héros de cette scène !

En 2006, Peter Norman décède finalement à Melbourne, en Australie. Pendant des décennies, il a a donc été pour beaucoup "l'homme qui n'a pas levé le poing" tout en étant complètement déconsidéré par son propre pays puis, pire encore, oublié. À son décès, les deux sprinteurs américains ont tenu à porter son cercueil

This iconic photograph is from the 1968 Olympics. What Tommie Smith and John Carlos did was a 'black power' salute on the podium. The idea of this salute was Peter Norman's who did not perform the salute himself. Norman, an Australian, was later blacklisted from appearing at any future Olympics because he supported black rights. He was ostracized and went into severe depression and took to substance abuse.

This iconic photograph is from the 1968 Olympics. What Tommie Smith and John Carlos did was a 'black power' salute on the podium. The idea of this salute was Peter Norman's who did not perform the salute himself. Norman, an Australian, was later blacklisted from appearing at any future Olympics because he supported black rights. He was ostracized and went into severe depression and took to substance abuse.

American athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos raise their fists and hang their heads while the U.S. national anthem plays during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Their black power salute became front page news around the world as a symbol of the struggle for civil rights. To their left stood Australian Peter Norman, who expressed his support by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge.

American athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos raise their fists and hang their heads while the U.S. national anthem plays during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Their black power salute became front page news around the world as a symbol of the struggle for civil rights. To their left stood Australian Peter Norman, who expressed his support by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge.

Photo: American athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos raise their fists and hang their heads while the U.S. national anthem plays during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Their black power salute became front page news around the world as a symbol of the struggle for civil rights. To their left stood Australian Peter Norman, who expressed his support by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge.

Photo: American athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos raise their fists and hang their heads while the U.S. national anthem plays during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Their black power salute became front page news around the world as a symbol of the struggle for civil rights. To their left stood Australian Peter Norman, who expressed his support by wearing an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge.

American sprinters Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos (right), after winning gold and bronze Olympic medals in the 200m, respectively, raise their fists in a Black Power salute, Mexico, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left.

John Dominis: Celebrating the Work of a Master Photographer

American sprinters Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos (right), after winning gold and bronze Olympic medals in the 200m, respectively, raise their fists in a Black Power salute, Mexico, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left.

WHO WAS THE WHITE MAN IN THAT PHOTO the day of John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture when they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City It was Peter Norman who had ran the race of a lifetime.Norman died suddenly from a heart attack in 2006, without his country ever having apologized for their treatment of him. At his funeral Tommie Smith and John Carlos, Norman’s friends since that moment in 1968, were his pallbearers, sending him off as a hero.

WHO WAS THE WHITE MAN IN THAT PHOTO the day of John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture when they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City It was Peter Norman who had ran the race of a lifetime.Norman died suddenly from a heart attack in 2006, without his country ever having apologized for their treatment of him. At his funeral Tommie Smith and John Carlos, Norman’s friends since that moment in 1968, were his pallbearers, sending him off as a hero.

October 17, 1968: Olympic Protestors Stripped of Their Medals     On this day in 1968, Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith and bronze medalist John Carlos were forced to return their track and field awards. During the medal ceremony the previous day, both American athletes raised their fists in a black–power salute.     International Olympic Committee President Avery Brundage criticized the athletes’ stance, claiming that it renounced “the basic principles of the Olympic games.”

October 17, 1968: Olympic Protestors Stripped of Their Medals On this day in 1968, Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith and bronze medalist John Carlos were forced to return their track and field awards. During the medal ceremony the previous day, both American athletes raised their fists in a black–power salute. International Olympic Committee President Avery Brundage criticized the athletes’ stance, claiming that it renounced “the basic principles of the Olympic games.”

1950's TV Shows on DVD here http://nostalgiastore.co.uk/?dvds-tv-shows,17,1

1950's TV Shows on DVD here http://nostalgiastore.co.uk/?dvds-tv-shows,17,1

Peter Norman. Giving up on his dreams to set a mark on human rights. The real story behind the statues.

The real story behind the statues.

Peter Norman. Giving up on his dreams to set a mark on human rights. The real story behind the statues.

Sometimes photographs deceive. Take this one, for example. It represents John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture the day they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer...

Sometimes photographs deceive. Take this one, for example. It represents John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture the day they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer...