The Paris Peace Accords and the Last Days of the Vietnam War

Last Days of the Vietnam War & the Paris Peace Accords

There were 5 U.S. Presidents during its involvement in the Vietnam War. They were: 1. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961) After the Geneva Accords were signed between the French and Communist Viet Minh leading to a partition of Vietnam, Eisenhower decided to create the South East Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) with the purpose of stopping communist... Continue reading

There were 5 U.S. Presidents during its involvement in the Vietnam War. They were: 1. Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961) After the Geneva Accords were signed between the French and Communist Viet Minh leading to a partition of Vietnam, Eisenhower decided to create the South East Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) with the purpose of stopping communist... Continue reading

This Day in #History: On January 23, 1973, US President Richard Nixon went on air to announce a peace accord with #Vietnam, known as the Paris Peace Accords (image source: wikipedia)

This Day in #History: On January 23, 1973, US President Richard Nixon went on air to announce a peace accord with #Vietnam, known as the Paris Peace Accords (image source: wikipedia)

January 27th 1973 - Paris Peace Accords officially end the Vietnam War. Colonel William Nolde is killed in action becoming the confilcts last recorded American combat casualty.

January 27th 1973 - Paris Peace Accords officially end the Vietnam War. Colonel William Nolde is killed in action becoming the confilcts last recorded American combat casualty.

March 9, 1973 After the Paris Peace Accords signed on January 27, 1973, the greatest exchange of prisoners in the Vietnam War took place in the Spring of 1973, near Thach Han River (Quang Tri province).  Here the North Vietnamese prisoners released by the South Vietnamese are running towards their comrades in arms.  South Vietnamese flags can be seen flying in the background. (© Chu Chi Thành)

March 9, 1973 After the Paris Peace Accords signed on January 27, 1973, the greatest exchange of prisoners in the Vietnam War took place in the Spring of 1973, near Thach Han River (Quang Tri province). Here the North Vietnamese prisoners released by the South Vietnamese are running towards their comrades in arms. South Vietnamese flags can be seen flying in the background. (© Chu Chi Thành)

Abandoned In Place - “Abandoned in Place” provides a snapshot of the Vietnam POW/MIA issue. From the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, in January 1973, ending American involvement in the war in Southeast Asia to the "dysfunctional" POW/MIA accounting effort of 2014. With the period 1980 -1981 a clear line in the sand. As the U.S. government refocused its efforts from the rescue of surviving POWs to the recovery of remains.

Abandoned In Place

Abandoned In Place - “Abandoned in Place” provides a snapshot of the Vietnam POW/MIA issue. From the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, in January 1973, ending American involvement in the war in Southeast Asia to the "dysfunctional" POW/MIA accounting effort of 2014. With the period 1980 -1981 a clear line in the sand. As the U.S. government refocused its efforts from the rescue of surviving POWs to the recovery of remains.

1991 Paris Peace Accords

1991 Paris Peace Accords

The Paris Peace Accords signed-January 27, 1973 The U.S., South Vietnam, Vietnam Cong, and North Vietnam formally signed an agreement on this day which formally ended the war and restored peace to Vietnam. It ended military combat for the U.S. completely and the fighting temporarily stopped between North and South Vietnam.

The Paris Peace Accords signed-January 27, 1973 The U.S., South Vietnam, Vietnam Cong, and North Vietnam formally signed an agreement on this day which formally ended the war and restored peace to Vietnam. It ended military combat for the U.S. completely and the fighting temporarily stopped between North and South Vietnam.

Nixon Legacy Forum: Vietnam and the Paris Peace Accords - YouTube

Nixon Legacy Forum: Vietnam and the Paris Peace Accords - YouTube

44. A South Vietnamese widow cries as a bell at a Saigon Buddhist pagoda tolls the ceasefire at 8 a.m., on Sunday, January 28, 1973, Saigon time. The United States had begun drastically reducing forces in the country, and, following the Paris Peace Accords of 1973, the last remaining American troops withdrew in March of 1973.  Neal Ulevich/AP

The Vietnam War, Part II: Losses and Withdrawal

44. A South Vietnamese widow cries as a bell at a Saigon Buddhist pagoda tolls the ceasefire at 8 a.m., on Sunday, January 28, 1973, Saigon time. The United States had begun drastically reducing forces in the country, and, following the Paris Peace Accords of 1973, the last remaining American troops withdrew in March of 1973. Neal Ulevich/AP

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