Eleven years after the outbreak of the Mexican War of Independence, Spanish Viceroy Juan de O’Donojú signs the Treaty of Córdoba, which approves a plan to make Mexico an independent constitutional monarchy.  In the early 19th century, Napoleon’s occupation of Spain led to the outbreak of revolts all across Spanish America. On September 16, 1810, Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest, launched the Mexican War of Independence with the issuing of his Grito de Dolores, or “Cry of…

Eleven years after the outbreak of the Mexican War of Independence, Spanish Viceroy Juan de O’Donojú signs the Treaty of Córdoba, which approves a plan to make Mexico an independent constitutional monarchy. In the early 19th century, Napoleon’s occupation of Spain led to the outbreak of revolts all across Spanish America. On September 16, 1810, Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest, launched the Mexican War of Independence with the issuing of his Grito de Dolores, or “Cry of…

Image result for mexican war of independence

Image result for mexican war of independence

8/24/1821  Spain accepts Mexican independence http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/spain-accepts-mexican-independence

8/24/1821 Spain accepts Mexican independence http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/spain-accepts-mexican-independence

#TodayInCAHistory: On June 10, 1846, a herd of 170 horses en route to Alta California's acting Governor Jose Castro were taken by a group of U.S. settlers. Due to settlers' fears that the horses would be used by Castro to drive foreigners out of the Mexican territory, the herd was taken to the camp where U.S. Captain John Fremont and his troops were resting at the junction of the Bear and Feather rivers. The event was the first strike in the insurgency that became the Bear Flag Revolt.

#TodayInCAHistory: On June 10, 1846, a herd of 170 horses en route to Alta California's acting Governor Jose Castro were taken by a group of U.S. settlers. Due to settlers' fears that the horses would be used by Castro to drive foreigners out of the Mexican territory, the herd was taken to the camp where U.S. Captain John Fremont and his troops were resting at the junction of the Bear and Feather rivers. The event was the first strike in the insurgency that became the Bear Flag Revolt.

Mexican War of Independence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mexican War of Independence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Army of the Three Guarantees enters Mexico city on September 27, 1821. Description from medlibrary.org. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Army of the Three Guarantees enters Mexico city on September 27, 1821. Description from medlibrary.org. I searched for this on bing.com/images

War Part 1: In the picture above is the Mexican war of independence. Mexico has been in  many wars in the past, but this one was one of the most important. The mexican war of independence was a movement for what Mexico used to be called, New spain. Mexico was one of the first countries to fight against Spain. Spain wanted Mexico’s territory, but Mexico didn’t want to give that territory up to Spain. So they went into a war from 1810 to 1821. So they went into a war from 1810 to 1821.

War Part 1: In the picture above is the Mexican war of independence. Mexico has been in many wars in the past, but this one was one of the most important. The mexican war of independence was a movement for what Mexico used to be called, New spain. Mexico was one of the first countries to fight against Spain. Spain wanted Mexico’s territory, but Mexico didn’t want to give that territory up to Spain. So they went into a war from 1810 to 1821. So they went into a war from 1810 to 1821.

Three Amigos: Friends in life and Friends in the Afterlife.  Mexican Mariachis from the “Comedia Ranchera” films of the 1930s and 1940s were happy-go-lucky’ friends from Veracruz in life (left) and also in death (right).  Nothing changes except the skeletal frames which now hold their souls in the afterlife. In death, as in life, proud friends still gather to celebrate events such as The Mexican War of Independence and The Mexican Revolution.

Three Amigos: Friends in life and Friends in the Afterlife. Mexican Mariachis from the “Comedia Ranchera” films of the 1930s and 1940s were happy-go-lucky’ friends from Veracruz in life (left) and also in death (right). Nothing changes except the skeletal frames which now hold their souls in the afterlife. In death, as in life, proud friends still gather to celebrate events such as The Mexican War of Independence and The Mexican Revolution.

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