Mary queen of scots

Mary Queen of Scots bedroom in Holyroodhouse Palace. Queen Victoria made sure that Mary Queen of Scots' bedroom and outer chamber were diligently preserved exactly the way it was left by Mary. It was in the outer chamber that Mary's beloved assistant David Rizzo was brutally murdered by her husband in front of her face. David was ripped from behind Mary's skirts and dragged across the floor before he was murdered.

Mary Queen of Scots bedroom in Holyroodhouse Palace. Queen Victoria made sure that Mary Queen of Scots' bedroom and outer chamber were diligently preserved exactly the way it was left by Mary.

Large sapphire ring, said to have belonged to Mary, Queen of Scots. It has been in the Hamilton Collection since 1587. The inscription on the back of the bezel reads, in 17th-century writing, "Sent by Queen Mary of Scotland at her death". On the hoop are the words, "to John, Mar Hamilton". The 1st Marquis of Hamilton had been one of Mary's staunchest supporters. He went into exile after her defeat  in 1568, but in 1585, James VI welcomed him back, praising his fidelity.

Sapphire ring of Mary, Queen of Scots - This historic ring has a fine table-cut sapphire set on a gold hoop with an inscription on the back of the bezel which reads ‘Sent by Queen Mary of Scotland at her death’.

Death Mask of Mary Queen of Scots at Lennoxlove House exclusive use wedding venue in Scotland, photo (c) Donna Dailey from http://www.beyond-london-travel.com/Lennoxlove-House.html

Death Mask of Mary Queen of Scots. Elizabeth prevaricated over signing the death warrant, but eventually did and Mary was executed at Fotheringhay Castle, on 8 February 1587 at the age of 44

The Darnley Jewel - Mary, Queen of Scots

The Darnley or Lennox Jewel It is said to have been commissioned by Lady Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox for her husband Matthew Stewart, Earl of Lennox and Regent of Scotland, who fell in battle in 1571 all-things-tudor

Mary, Queen of Scots' death mask. Although most death masks - taken soon after the person was executed - are white, this one has been hand-painted.

Death mask of Mary Queen of Scots. She was very beautiful and it is said that Queen Elizabeth was jealous of her beauty. I've read a book about the Queen of scots- er, rather her fool. It was a historical fiction, though, called The Queen's Own Fool

Prayer book and rosary carried by Mary Queen of Scots to her execution.

Mary, Queen of Scots' prayer book and prayer beads that she took to her execution

Chemise belonging to Mary, Queen of Scots in which she was executed at Fotheringhay Castle. Of fine linen with drawn thread borders incribed on the bodice in red and dated Feb 11 1587. This is an Elizabethan undergarment and only one other of this type is known to survive.

SCOTLAND: Chemise belonging to Mary, Queen of Scots in which she was executed at Fotheringhay Castle. Of fine linen with drawn thread borders inscribed on the bodice in red, and dated Feb 11 Only one other undergarment of this type is known to survive.

Francis II of France & his wife Mary, Queen of Scots. (The double portrait was taken from Francis' mother, Catherine De Medici's "Book of Hours".)

Mary, Queen of Scots, in Pictures

Francis II of France & his wife Mary, Queen of Scots. (The double portrait was taken from Francis' mother, Catherine De Medici's "Book of Hours".) Mary married Francis II of France He was the son of Henry II of France and Catherine de Medici.

Mary, Queen of Scots, was one of the most fascinating and controversial monarchs of 16th century Europe. At one time, she claimed the crowns of four nations - Scotland, France, England and Ireland. Her physical beauty and kind heart were acknowledged even by her enemies. Yet she lacked the political skills to rule successfully in Scotland.

Mary, queen of Scots, in an official portrait at the Blairs Museum – The Museum of Scotland’s Catholic Heritage.This striking portrait of Mary was painted during her brief adult rule in Scotland.

Mary Queen of Scots in captivity

Mary, Queen of Scots in Captivity The atifet was a heart-shaped headdress worn in the second half of the sixteenth century. It evolved from the French hood and was often worn by Mary, Queen of Scots, amongst others.

In 1603 Queen Mary's son, now King James I of England, sent Garter King of Arms with a pall decorated with Mary's arms to place on her tomb. A new tomb for her in Westminster Abbey was commissioned in 1606 from Cornelius Cure and, following his death the next year completed by his son William.

The Tomb Effigy of Mary, Queen of Scots, Westminster Abbey, London-Mistress of Scotland by law, of France by marriage.

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