Marcus Licinius Crassus | eHISTORY

Marcus Licinius Crassus | eHISTORY

Marcus Licinius Crassus (Diagram Lajard)

Marcus Licinius Crassus

Marcus Licinius Crassus (Diagram Lajard)

Marcus Licinius Crassus (Latin: M·LICINIVS·P·F·P·N·CRASSVS[1]) (ca. 115 BC – 53 BC) was a Roman general and politician who played a key role in the transformation of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. Amassing an enormous fortune during his life, Crassus is considered the wealthiest man in Roman history, and among the richest men in all history.

The Rise and Fall of Julius Caesar's Political Life

Marcus Licinius Crassus (Latin: M·LICINIVS·P·F·P·N·CRASSVS[1]) (ca. 115 BC – 53 BC) was a Roman general and politician who played a key role in the transformation of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. Amassing an enormous fortune during his life, Crassus is considered the wealthiest man in Roman history, and among the richest men in all history.

A Profile of Crassus, a Roman Businessman and Politician: 93 BC, Roman General Marcus Licinius Crassus (circa 115 - 53 BC).

A Profile of Crassus, a Roman Businessman and Politician

A Profile of Crassus, a Roman Businessman and Politician: 93 BC, Roman General Marcus Licinius Crassus (circa 115 - 53 BC).

First Triumvirate: Julius Caesar, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, and Marcus Licinius Crassus

First Triumvirate: Julius Caesar, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, and Marcus Licinius Crassus

Marcus Licinius Crassus.  At the meeting, a Parthian pulled at Crassus' reins, sparking violence. Crassus and his generals were killed. After his death, the Parthians allegedly poured molten gold down his throat, in a symbolic gesture mocking Crassus' renowned greed.  The remaining Romans at Carrhae attempted to flee, but most were captured or killed. Roman casualties amounted to about 20,000 killed and 10,000 captured, making the battle one of the costliest defeats in Roman history.

Marcus Licinius Crassus. At the meeting, a Parthian pulled at Crassus' reins, sparking violence. Crassus and his generals were killed. After his death, the Parthians allegedly poured molten gold down his throat, in a symbolic gesture mocking Crassus' renowned greed. The remaining Romans at Carrhae attempted to flee, but most were captured or killed. Roman casualties amounted to about 20,000 killed and 10,000 captured, making the battle one of the costliest defeats in Roman history.

POMPEY (106BC-48BC) joined Marcus Licinius Crassus and Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate. When Caesar's power seemed to be turning autocratic, Pompey joined the conservative aristocrats in opposing him. Pompey was defeated in battle & murdered in Egypt by a contender for that nation's throne in the hope that it would curry favor with Caesar.

POMPEY (106BC-48BC) joined Marcus Licinius Crassus and Julius Caesar in the unofficial military-political alliance known as the First Triumvirate. When Caesar's power seemed to be turning autocratic, Pompey joined the conservative aristocrats in opposing him. Pompey was defeated in battle & murdered in Egypt by a contender for that nation's throne in the hope that it would curry favor with Caesar.

Marcus Licinius Crassus is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list The Most Bizarre Deaths in the Ancient World

The Most Bizarre Deaths in the Ancient World

Marcus Licinius Crassus is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list The Most Bizarre Deaths in the Ancient World

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great. He was part of Triumvirate with Gaius Julius Caesar and Marcus Licinius Crassus.

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great. He was part of Triumvirate with Gaius Julius Caesar and Marcus Licinius Crassus.

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