Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) - was named after listening to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" by the Beatles when she was discovered by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray.

Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) - was named after listening to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" by the Beatles when she was discovered by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray.

Evo awesomness

Anthropology Tshirt, Funny Science Pun, I love Lucy, Gift for Her

Remains:  3.2-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis #skeleton called "Lucy," part of an exhibit displayed during a press preview at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, Houston, Texas, USA.

Remains: 3.2-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis #skeleton called "Lucy," part of an exhibit displayed during a press preview at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, Houston, Texas, USA.

November 24, 1974 – Donald Johanson and Tom Gray discover the 40% complete…

November 24, 1974 – Donald Johanson and Tom Gray discover the 40% complete…

Reconstruction of Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) museum diorama by John Gurche at the Smithsonian Institute

Reconstruction of Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) museum diorama by John Gurche at the Smithsonian Institute

'Lucy' (Australopithecus afarensis) via Wikipedia.org -- Skeletal reconstruction of the 3.2 million year old, first hominid. Notice the near fully adducted hallux (big toe) of the left foot.

'Lucy' (Australopithecus afarensis) via Wikipedia.org -- Skeletal reconstruction of the 3.2 million year old, first hominid. Notice the near fully adducted hallux (big toe) of the left foot.

‘The Hidden Treasures of Ethiopa’ exhibit at Houston Museum of Natural Science featuring a model of “Lucy”, Australopithecus Afarensis.

‘The Hidden Treasures of Ethiopa’ exhibit at Houston Museum of Natural Science featuring a model of “Lucy”, Australopithecus Afarensis.

Today is the 41st anniversary of the find of Lucy  (Australopithecus), in Ethiopia.

Today is the 41st anniversary of the find of Lucy (Australopithecus), in Ethiopia.

Meet Sediba*, a 2 million year-old Australopithecus sediba, who, along with 4 others of her species, has provided  paleontologists with - the first-ever kneecap, the most well-preserved upper limb, and a complete set of foot, leg and hip pieces from an adult female that have allowed her gait to be decoded. *She hasn't been given a name, so I'm calling her Sediba - after all, Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) got a name!

Meet Sediba*, a 2 million year-old Australopithecus sediba, who, along with 4 others of her species, has provided paleontologists with - the first-ever kneecap, the most well-preserved upper limb, and a complete set of foot, leg and hip pieces from an adult female that have allowed her gait to be decoded. *She hasn't been given a name, so I'm calling her Sediba - after all, Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) got a name!

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