Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) - was named after listening to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" by the Beatles when she was discovered by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray.

Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) - was named after listening to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" by the Beatles when she was discovered by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray.

Australopithecus afarensis was one of the longest-lived and best known early human species (reconstruction pictured). The species, whose most famous fossil 'Lucy' comes from Ethiopia, roamed the Earth around 3.2 million years ago - but recent evidence has suggested they were not alone

Lucy was not alone: 4 different human species lived 3million years ago

Australopithecus afarensis was one of the longest-lived and best known early human species (reconstruction pictured). The species, whose most famous fossil 'Lucy' comes from Ethiopia, roamed the Earth around 3.2 million years ago - but recent evidence has suggested they were not alone

Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. The most famous fossil is the partial skeleton named Lucy (3.2 million years old) found by Donald Johanson and colleagues.

Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. The most famous fossil is the partial skeleton named Lucy (3.2 million years old) found by Donald Johanson and colleagues.

The famous skeleton Lucy has had a makeover, thanks to newly discovered fossils. A reconstruction of the 3.2-million-year-old hominin emerge...

The famous skeleton Lucy has had a makeover, thanks to newly discovered fossils. A reconstruction of the 3.2-million-year-old hominin emerge...

A model of Lucy the Australopithecus at the Field Museum in Chicago

How related are we to Lucy the Australopithecus?

A fossil of a 3.4 million-year-old hominin has been found by researchers who say this could be an entirely new species of early human, previously unknown to history. This new and distinct hominin is thought to have lived side by side with Australopithecus afarensis, commonly identified with the well-known skeleton Lucy, and was one of several diverse species of hominins living in the northern region of Ethiopia between 3.3 and 3.5 million years ago.

A fossil of a 3.4 million-year-old hominin has been found by researchers who say this could be an entirely new species of early human, previously unknown to history. This new and distinct hominin is thought to have lived side by side with Australopithecus afarensis, commonly identified with the well-known skeleton Lucy, and was one of several diverse species of hominins living in the northern region of Ethiopia between 3.3 and 3.5 million years ago.

A sculptor's rendering of Lucy when she was alive, displayed at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Texas

Five things you might not know about Lucy the Australopithecus

A sculptor's rendering of Lucy when she was alive, displayed at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in Texas

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