Fukabachi Jar- This deep jar is from the Middle Jomon period (2600-1500 B.C.E.). It was used for cooking. Since this jar was from the Middle Jomon Period, it is a prime example of the densely decorated, rope-patterned style of the period. It also has a flame-like style, a characteristic present in many other Jomon pots.

Fukabachi Jar- This deep jar is from the Middle Jomon period (2600-1500 B.C.E.). It was used for cooking. Since this jar was from the Middle Jomon Period, it is a prime example of the densely decorated, rope-patterned style of the period. It also has a flame-like style, a characteristic present in many other Jomon pots.

Dogu are from the earliest-dated tradition of pottery manufacture in the world, dating to the prehistoric Jomon period, which began 16,000 years ago.

Dogu are from the earliest-dated tradition of pottery manufacture in the world, dating to the prehistoric Jomon period, which began 16,000 years ago.

Image result for jomon period ceramics

Image result for jomon period ceramics

Style of houses jomon period persona 3

Style of houses jomon period persona 3

Japan, Middle Jomon Period (c. 10,500-c. 300 BC), earthenware with impressed and carved decoration, Diameter: w. 36.8 cm (14 7/16 in); Overall: h. 44.7 cm (17 9/16 in). John L. Severance Fund 1998.32

Japan, Middle Jomon Period (c. 10,500-c. 300 BC), earthenware with impressed and carved decoration, Diameter: w. 36.8 cm (14 7/16 in); Overall: h. 44.7 cm (17 9/16 in). John L. Severance Fund 1998.32

Jomon pot  The pottery vessels crafted in Ancient Japan during the Jōmon period are generally accepted to be some of the oldest in the world

Jomon pot The pottery vessels crafted in Ancient Japan during the Jōmon period are generally accepted to be some of the oldest in the world

The power of dogu: ceramic figures from ancient Japan. Animal-faced dogū. Kamikurokoma, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan. 2500–1500 BC. On loan from Tokyo National Museum. Dogu are from the earliest-dated tradition of pottery manufacture in the world, dating to the prehistoric Jomon period, which began 16,000 years ago. Most of the figures in the exhibition are from about 2500 BC to 1000 BC (the Middle and Late Jomon periods) and show the development of the sculptural form over time.

The power of dogu: ceramic figures from ancient Japan. Animal-faced dogū. Kamikurokoma, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan. 2500–1500 BC. On loan from Tokyo National Museum. Dogu are from the earliest-dated tradition of pottery manufacture in the world, dating to the prehistoric Jomon period, which began 16,000 years ago. Most of the figures in the exhibition are from about 2500 BC to 1000 BC (the Middle and Late Jomon periods) and show the development of the sculptural form over time.

Jomon period style of houses

Jomon period style of houses

Jomon period style of houses

Jomon period style of houses

Needles, hooks, and harpoon [Japan] (1975.268.333-345) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Needles, hooks, and harpoon [Japan] (1975.268.333-345) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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