Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

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In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the moon pounding rice for omchi (rice cake).

In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the moon pounding rice for omchi (rice cake).

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The nurikabe is a spirit from Japanese folklore. It manifests as a wall that impedes or misdirects walking travelers at night.

The nurikabe is a spirit from Japanese folklore. It manifests as a wall that impedes or misdirects walking travelers at night.

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Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

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Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into men or women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories…

Kitsune (狐 or きつね, Kitsune) is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore; in English, kitsune refers to them in this context. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. According to Yōkai folklore, all foxes have the ability to shape shift into men or women. While some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do—other stories…

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Katsushika Hokusai - The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 1832

Katsushika Hokusai - The Ghost of Oiwa (Oiwa-san), from the series One Hundred Ghost Stories (Hyaku monogatari) 1832

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Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman.   http://www.pinktentacle.com --Japanese

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. http://www.pinktentacle.com --Japanese

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Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater - The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater - The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

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