he Mansyū Ki-98, (also written as Manshū Ki-98),[1] was a Japanese ground-attack aircraft proposed by Mansyū (Manshūkoku Hikōki K.K. - Manchurian Aeroplane Manufacturing Company Ltd.) during World War II for use by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. The first prototype was deliberately destroyed before Japan surrendered.

he Mansyū Ki-98, (also written as Manshū Ki-98),[1] was a Japanese ground-attack aircraft proposed by Mansyū (Manshūkoku Hikōki K.K. - Manchurian Aeroplane Manufacturing Company Ltd.) during World War II for use by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. The first prototype was deliberately destroyed before Japan surrendered.

A uranium gun-type atomic bomb (Little Boy) was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, followed by a plutonium implosion-type bomb (Fat Man) on the city of Nagasaki on August 9.

A uranium gun-type atomic bomb (Little Boy) was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, followed by a plutonium implosion-type bomb (Fat Man) on the city of Nagasaki on August 9.

USS MISSOURI at Pearl Harbor. USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honor of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship commissioned by the United States and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.

USS MISSOURI at Pearl Harbor. USS Missouri (BB-63) ("Mighty Mo" or "Big Mo") is a United States Navy Iowa-class battleship and was the third ship of the U.S. Navy to be named in honor of the US state of Missouri. Missouri was the last battleship commissioned by the United States and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended World War II.

TOKYO — Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu, center in top hat, leads the Japanese delegation aboard the Missouri in Tokyo Bay for the signing ceremony for Japan's surrender in World War II.

Surrender aboard U.S. warship Missouri ends World War II

TOKYO — Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu, center in top hat, leads the Japanese delegation aboard the Missouri in Tokyo Bay for the signing ceremony for Japan's surrender in World War II.

15 August 1945: Crowds assemble in Piccadilly Circus to celebrate the news of Japan's surrender and the end of the second world war.

15 August 1945: Crowds assemble in Piccadilly Circus to celebrate the news of Japan's surrender and the end of the second world war.

TONY CURTIS (aka Bernard Schwartz) serving in World War II. Before he reinvented himself as a Hollywood star, Curtis served in the U.S. Navy during WWII.  He was seventeen years old when Japan surrendered to the Allied Forces in Toyko bay, where he was stationed. He witnessed the historic signing ceremony aboard his ship, the U.S.S. Proteus.

TONY CURTIS (aka Bernard Schwartz) serving in World War II. Before he reinvented himself as a Hollywood star, Curtis served in the U.S. Navy during WWII. He was seventeen years old when Japan surrendered to the Allied Forces in Toyko bay, where he was stationed. He witnessed the historic signing ceremony aboard his ship, the U.S.S. Proteus.

japan's surrender

Japan's Surrender

Surrender of Japan, Tokyo Bay, 2 September Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, signs the Instrument of Surrender as United States Representative, on board USS Missouri 2 September

A first for the general public, the picture of the “mushroom cloud”? is a very accurate approximation of the enormous quantity of energy spread below. The first atomic bomb, released on August 6 in Hiroshima(Japan) killed about 80,000 people, but it didn’t seem enough because the Japanese didn’t surrender right away. Therefore, on August 9 another bomb was released above Nagasaki. The effects of the second bomb were even more devastating – 150,000 people were killed or injured.

World's Lasts

A first for the general public, the picture of the “mushroom cloud”? is a very accurate approximation of the enormous quantity of energy spread below. The first atomic bomb, released on August 6 in Hiroshima(Japan) killed about 80,000 people, but it didn’t seem enough because the Japanese didn’t surrender right away. Therefore, on August 9 another bomb was released above Nagasaki. The effects of the second bomb were even more devastating – 150,000 people were killed or injured.

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