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An adult Jackson's Chameleon with a baby not yet old enough to change its colouring (Rick Stevens)

An adult Jackson's Chameleon with a baby not yet old enough to change its colouring (Rick Stevens) Baby or Avoidance?

An adult Jackson's Chameleon with a baby not yet old enough to change its colouring.

An adult Jackson's Cameleon with a baby not yet old enough to change its coloring (Rick Stevens)

Jackson's Chameleon, Native to Eastern Africa // photo by David Northcott

Jackson's Chameleon, Native to Eastern Africa

Jackson's Chameleon, Native to Eastern Africa // photo by David Northcott (Mutated creature inspiration).

Chameleon

Do You See What I See? I Guess It Depends Where Your Eyes Are.

A Newly Born Jackson's Chameleon Rests on its Dad's Horns Photographic

Jackson’s Chameleon  A particularly wild-looking species of chameleon, with a three-horned head that gives it the appearance of a miniature Triceratops.

Jackson’s Chameleon A particularly wild-looking species of chameleon, with a three-horned head that gives it the appearance of a miniature Triceratops.

There is a road from the eye to the heart that does not go through the intellect.  ~Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Jackson's Chameleon (Trioceros jacksonii), native to East Africa but introduced into Hawaii and Florida. Only males have the horns. They're popular as pets but not the easiest to keep. They dislike being handled, need solitude and are easily stressed.

Jackson's Chameleon, Chameleo jacksonii (male), Three-horned Chameleon, subspecies Dwarf Jackson's Chameleon, and Yellow-crested Jackson's Chameleon

Jackson's Chameleons are awesome. If I were like a rock star or someone with gobs of money I'd turn a room of my house into a treed junglescape and have a couple of these fellows climbing around.

Jackson's chameleon by Christian Sanchez on 500px

Jackson's chameleon Photo by Christian Sanchez — National Geographic Your Shot