Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

Castell Henllys. "The Iron Age Celts' clothes might have looked like the tartan you see in Scotland and Ireland today, with checks and stripes. The Celts used berries and plants to dye the wool different colours."-BBC

British Museum - The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. #Celts

British Museum - The Battersea shield. Iron Age, c. 350–50 BC. Found in the River Thames, London, England. #Celts

The Chalice Well, Glastonbury, England Also known as ‘The Well of Avalon’. Archaeological evidence suggests that the well has been in almost constant use for at least two thousand years. Water issues from the spring at a rate of 25,000 gallons per day and has never failed. female aspect of deity, with the male symbolised by Glastonbury Tor. As such, it is a popular destination for pilgrims in search of the divine feminine, including Pagans.

The Chalice Well, Glastonbury, England Also known as ‘The Well of Avalon’. Archaeological evidence suggests that the well has been in almost constant use for at least two thousand years. Water issues from the spring at a rate of 25,000 gallons per day and has never failed. female aspect of deity, with the male symbolised by Glastonbury Tor. As such, it is a popular destination for pilgrims in search of the divine feminine, including Pagans.

Celtic:  Recreation of the interior and furnishings of an Iron-Age Celtic roundhouse, Castell Henlly, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Photo by John Warburton-lee.

Celtic: Recreation of the interior and furnishings of an Iron-Age Celtic roundhouse, Castell Henlly, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Photo by John Warburton-lee.

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched.        All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

The main frame of the roundhouse would have been made of upright timbers, which were interwoven with coppiced wood - usually hazel, oak, ash or pollarded willow - to make wattle walls. This was then covered with a daub made from clay, soil, straw and animal manure that would weatherproof the house. The roof was constructed from large timbers and densely thatched. All of the domestic life would have occurred within the roundhouse.

This reconstruction drawing illustrates the settlement at Silchester as it may have appeared during the Iron Age. After the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, the settlement developed into a town. Peter Urmston

This reconstruction drawing illustrates the settlement at Silchester as it may have appeared during the Iron Age. After the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, the settlement developed into a town. Peter Urmston

Fragments of Iron Age textiles from the Celtic saltmines at Hallstatt, Austria 506×720 píxeles

Fragments of Iron Age textiles from the Celtic saltmines at Hallstatt, Austria 506×720 píxeles

The La Tène culture was a European Iron Age culture named after the archaeological site of La Tène on the north side of Neuenburgersee in Switzerland, where a rich cache of artifacts was discovered by Hansli Kopp in 1857. La Tène culture developed and flourished during the late Iron Age (from 450 BCE to the Roman conquest in the 1st century BCE) in Belgium, eastern France, Switzerland, Austria, Southern Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.

The La Tène culture was a European Iron Age culture named after the archaeological site of La Tène on the north side of Neuenburgersee in Switzerland, where a rich cache of artifacts was discovered by Hansli Kopp in 1857. La Tène culture developed and flourished during the late Iron Age (from 450 BCE to the Roman conquest in the 1st century BCE) in Belgium, eastern France, Switzerland, Austria, Southern Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Hungary and Romania.

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgau Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic. jewelry woman - http://amzn.to/2iQZrK5

Reproduction of Latgallian/Latgau Iron Age from Latvia. Baltic, not Norse/Viking or Slavic. jewelry woman - http://amzn.to/2iQZrK5

Stone age to Iron age and Roman invasion  Planned with as part of the new 2014 History Curriculum for Year 3

Stone age to Iron age and Roman invasion Planned with as part of the new 2014 History Curriculum for Year 3

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