The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

What was the Investiture Controversy a Controversy About? :http://www.medievalists.net/2013/02/19/what-was-the-investiture-controversy-a-controversy-about/

What was the Investiture Controversy a Controversy About? :http://www.medievalists.net/2013/02/19/what-was-the-investiture-controversy-a-controversy-about/

Overview of the Middle Ages

Defining the Middle Ages

Overview of the Middle Ages

The Investiture Controversy - The Incident at Canossa - Medieval Catholicism; Ruins of the Castle at Canossa

The Investiture Controversy - The Incident at Canossa - Medieval Catholicism; Ruins of the Castle at Canossa

Matilda of Canossa (1046-1115, Italian) - With independence and conviction, Matilda, countess of Tuscany, led an unusual life for a woman of medieval days. Her military, financial, cultural, and, above all, spiritual support were instrumental in strengthening the power of the Church, especially the papacy, at a crucial time of conflict between the Church and the state known as the Investiture Controversy.

Matilda of Canossa (1046-1115, Italian) - With independence and conviction, Matilda, countess of Tuscany, led an unusual life for a woman of medieval days. Her military, financial, cultural, and, above all, spiritual support were instrumental in strengthening the power of the Church, especially the papacy, at a crucial time of conflict between the Church and the state known as the Investiture Controversy.

File:Kaiser Heinrich V. besucht seinen Vater im Gefängnis.jpg. Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV entered into an agreement with Pope Calixtus VI called the Concordant of Worms, temporarily settling the Investiture Controversy

File:Kaiser Heinrich V. besucht seinen Vater im Gefängnis.jpg. Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV entered into an agreement with Pope Calixtus VI called the Concordant of Worms, temporarily settling the Investiture Controversy

Pope Urban II - A 19th-century stained-glass depiction of Urban receiving St Anselm, exiled from England by William the Red amid the Investiture Controversy.

Pope Urban II - A 19th-century stained-glass depiction of Urban receiving St Anselm, exiled from England by William the Red amid the Investiture Controversy.

Henry V (11 August 1086[1] – 23 May 1125) was King of Germany (from 1099 to 1125) and Holy Roman Emperor (from 1111 to 1125), the fourth and last ruler of the Salian dynasty. Henry's reign coincided with the final phase of the great Investiture Controversy, which had pitted pope against emperor. By the settlement of the Concordat of Worms, he surrendered to the demands of the second generation of Gregorian reformers.

Henry V (11 August 1086[1] – 23 May 1125) was King of Germany (from 1099 to 1125) and Holy Roman Emperor (from 1111 to 1125), the fourth and last ruler of the Salian dynasty. Henry's reign coincided with the final phase of the great Investiture Controversy, which had pitted pope against emperor. By the settlement of the Concordat of Worms, he surrendered to the demands of the second generation of Gregorian reformers.

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