The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

What was the Investiture Controversy a Controversy About? :http://www.medievalists.net/2013/02/19/what-was-the-investiture-controversy-a-controversy-about/

What was the Investiture Controversy a Controversy About? :http://www.medievalists.net/2013/02/19/what-was-the-investiture-controversy-a-controversy-about/

The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The investiture controversy began as a power struggle between Pope Gregory VII and Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between Church and state in medieval Europe. In the 11th and 12th centuries, a series of Popes challenged the authority of European monarchies over control of appointments, or investitures, of church officials such as bishops and abbots. The investiture controversy began as a power struggle between Pope Gregory VII and Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor. The entire controversy was finally resolved by the Concordat of Worms in 1122.

ch 22 04 Crusades: The Investiture Controversy

ch 22 04 Crusades: The Investiture Controversy

The Investiture Controversy - The Incident at Canossa - Medieval Catholicism; Ruins of the Castle at Canossa

The Investiture Controversy - The Incident at Canossa - Medieval Catholicism; Ruins of the Castle at Canossa

Matilda of Canossa (1046-1115, Italian) - With independence and conviction, Matilda, countess of Tuscany, led an unusual life for a woman of medieval days. Her military, financial, cultural, and, above all, spiritual support were instrumental in strengthening the power of the Church, especially the papacy, at a crucial time of conflict between the Church and the state known as the Investiture Controversy.

Matilda of Canossa (1046-1115, Italian) - With independence and conviction, Matilda, countess of Tuscany, led an unusual life for a woman of medieval days. Her military, financial, cultural, and, above all, spiritual support were instrumental in strengthening the power of the Church, especially the papacy, at a crucial time of conflict between the Church and the state known as the Investiture Controversy.

Matilde di Canossa or Matilda of Tuscany (1046-1115) was a powerful feudal ruler in northern Italy and the chief Italian supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy.  In addition, she was one of the few medieval women to be remembered for her military accomplishments, thanks to which she was able to dominate all the territories north of the Church States.

Matilde di Canossa: potente feudataria nel Medioevo - Le donne nella storia d'Italia. Il racconto italiano in rosa

Matilde di Canossa or Matilda of Tuscany (1046-1115) was a powerful feudal ruler in northern Italy and the chief Italian supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the Investiture Controversy. In addition, she was one of the few medieval women to be remembered for her military accomplishments, thanks to which she was able to dominate all the territories north of the Church States.

Henry V (11 August 1086[1] – 23 May 1125) was King of Germany (from 1099 to 1125) and Holy Roman Emperor (from 1111 to 1125), the fourth and last ruler of the Salian dynasty. Henry's reign coincided with the final phase of the great Investiture Controversy, which had pitted pope against emperor. By the settlement of the Concordat of Worms, he surrendered to the demands of the second generation of Gregorian reformers.

Henry V (11 August 1086[1] – 23 May 1125) was King of Germany (from 1099 to 1125) and Holy Roman Emperor (from 1111 to 1125), the fourth and last ruler of the Salian dynasty. Henry's reign coincided with the final phase of the great Investiture Controversy, which had pitted pope against emperor. By the settlement of the Concordat of Worms, he surrendered to the demands of the second generation of Gregorian reformers.

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