Unesco grants Inca Qhapaq Nan road system World Heritage status

Inca roads win World Heritage status

Qhapaq Ñan, A road system built by the Inca Empire has been granted World Heritage status by the United Nations cultural agency, Unesco. The Qhapaq Nan roads go through six South American countries.

The Inca road system was the most extensive and advanced transportation system in pre-Columbian South America.

Did you know? If you linked together all the Inca roads it would almost wrap around the circumference of our entire planet.

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The Inca road system was the most extensive and advanced transportation system in pre-Columbian South America. It was about 39,900 kilometres (24,800 mi) long. The construction of the roads required a large expenditure of time and effort, and the quality of that construction is borne out by the fact that it is still in quite good condition after over 400 years of use. Qhapaq Ñan

The Inca road system was the most extensive and advanced transportation system in pre-Columbian South America. It was about 39,900 kilometres (24,800 mi) long. The construction of the roads required a large expenditure of time and effort, and the quality of that construction is borne out by the fact that it is still in quite good condition after over 400 years of use. Qhapaq Ñan

The Inca road system

The Inca road system formed a network known as the royal highway or qhapaq ñan, which became an invaluable part of the Inca empire, not only facilitating the movement of armies, people, and goods.

Qhapaq ñan, Andean road system (The Inca road system was the most extensive and advanced transportation system in pre-Columbian South America. The network was based on two north-south roads with numerous branches. The best known portion of the road system is the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu).

Qhapaq ñan, Andean road system (The Inca road system was the most extensive and advanced transportation system in pre-Columbian South America. The network was based on two north-south roads with numerous branches. The best known portion of the road system is the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu).

The Inca also raised llamas and alpacas for their wool, meat, and to use them as pack animals; they captured wild vicuñas for their fine hair. The Inca road system was key to farming success as it allowed distribution of food over long distances. They had no wheels, so these were paved footpaths for people and pack animals, straight and solid and sometimes 30 feet wide.

UNESCO Honours Inca Roads: a pre and post-Columbian Marvel

The Inca also raised llamas and alpacas for their wool, meat, and to use them as pack animals; they captured wild vicuñas for their fine hair. The Inca road system was key to farming success as it allowed distribution of food over long distances. They had no wheels, so these were paved footpaths for people and pack animals, straight and solid and sometimes 30 feet wide.

The Inca road system (called Capaq Ñan in Quechua and Gran Ruta Inca in Spanish) was an essential part of the success of the Inca Empire. The road system included an astounding 40,000 kilometers (25,000 miles) of roads, bridges, tunnels and causeways...

The Inca Controlled Their Empire Just Like the Romans: Good Roads

The Inca road system (called Capaq Ñan in Quechua and Gran Ruta Inca in Spanish) was an essential part of the success of the Inca Empire. The road system included an astounding kilometers miles) of roads, bridges, tunnels and causeways.

Andean Road System, Inca Trail, Peru

Andean Road System, Inca Trail, Peru

Camino del Inca (Qhapaq Ñan), declarado Patrimonio Mundial de la Humanidad - Trade - AllYouNeedisEcuador.Travel

Camino del Inca (Qhapaq Ñan), declarado Patrimonio Mundial de la Humanidad - Trade - AllYouNeedisEcuador.Travel

Inca Road System                                                                                                                                                      More

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