British WW1 Propaganda Posters · WW1 Army Posters. If the cap fits you, join the army to-day. Poster showing a military hat.

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An official photo describing the kit of a British infantryman in 1939. Note that the gas mask ('respirator') and anti-chemical warfare cape are parts of the outfit, remnants of WW1 memories. In actual combat, and marching with full kit, the British infantryman would carry a pack known as a "valise" that contained more clothing and personal items. Officers wore the exact same uniform save for markings of their rank.

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During both World Wars, many civilian women took up jobs in agriculture, replacing those men who went to war. The women who worked for the Women's Land Army (WLA) were commonly known as Land Girls. In forestry, Women's Timber Corps were known as Lumber Jills. At the height of the First World War the Land Army had a full-time membership of 23,000 members. The number exceeded 80,000 during the Second World War.

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Katrina Hodge: Corporal in the British Army & Miss England '09. She enlisted in the army on a dare from her brother & was nicknamed Combat Barbie after showing up to her unit wearing fake eyelashes, heels, & carrying a pink suitcase. While serving in Iraq, she saved the lives of her comrades by wresting not 1 but 2 rifles from a prisoner, then knocking him out w/ her bare hands. After winning the Miss England contest in 2009, she handed over the crown & returned to military service. #bamf…

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British Army officers pose next to projectiles fired by the "Dora" railway gun. Dora and its sibling "Gustav" were 80 cm guns developed in the late 1930s by Krupp as siege artillery for the purpose of destroying the French Maginot Line fortifications. The guns could fire shells weighing seven tonnes to a range of 47 km (29 mi). Gustav was captured by US troops and cut up, whilst Dora was destroyed near the end of the war in 1945 to avoid capture by the Red Army.

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Roman roads, together with Roman aqueducts and the vast standing Roman army, constituted the three most impressive features of the Roman Empire. In Britain, as in their other provinces, the Romans constructed a comprehensive network of paved trunk roads (i.e. surfaced highways) during their nearly four centuries of occupation (43 - 410 AD).

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