Two Reindeer, Cro-Magnon Painting from Font-de-Gaume Cave, Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil, France c.17,000 BCE

Two Reindeer, Cro-Magnon Painting from Font-de-Gaume Cave, Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil, France c.17,000 BCE

In Images: An Ancient European Hunter Gatherer | LiveScience

In Images: An Ancient European Hunter Gatherer

The Homestead Survival: The Modern Hunter-Gatherer: A Practical Guide To Living Off The Land Book  - Adventure Ideaz

The Homestead Survival: The Modern Hunter-Gatherer: A Practical Guide To Living Off The Land Book - Adventure Ideaz

Set of Three Neolithic Age Stone Artifacts were found just off the shore of the island of Funen, Denmark. This was the site of an ancient stone age settlement called "Mejloe", which is now covered by the Baltic sea.  The settlement dates to the Ertebölle Culture: 5,400 to 3,900 B.C.

Set of Three Neolithic Age Stone Artifacts were found just off the shore of the island of Funen, Denmark. This was the site of an ancient stone age settlement called "Mejloe", which is now covered by the Baltic sea. The settlement dates to the Ertebölle Culture: 5,400 to 3,900 B.C.

Artist's impression of a blue-eyed hunter gatherer

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Artist's impression of a blue-eyed hunter gatherer

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What was Life in Europe Like Before Farming?: Reconstructed Mesolithic Homestead - Archeon

What was Life in Europe Like Before Farming?

European hunter-gatherers acquired domesticated pigs from nearby farmers as early as 4600 BC, according to new evidence. The international team of scientists showed there was interaction between the hunter-gatherer and farming communities and a 'sharing' of animals and knowledge. The interaction between the two groups eventually led to the hunter-gatherers incorporating farming and breeding of livestock into their culture, say the scientists.

European hunter-gatherers owned pigs as early as 4600 BC

European hunter-gatherers acquired domesticated pigs from nearby farmers as early as 4600 BC, according to new evidence. The international team of scientists showed there was interaction between the hunter-gatherer and farming communities and a 'sharing' of animals and knowledge. The interaction between the two groups eventually led to the hunter-gatherers incorporating farming and breeding of livestock into their culture, say the scientists.

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