Human echolocation for the blind

Using echoes to navigate the world

Echolocation isn’t just for bats and dolphins—people can do it, too. Some blind people have learned to use echolocation to tell the size, density, and texture of objects around them, and researchers believe anyone can learn how.

Neural Correlates of Natural Human Echolocation in Early and Late Blind Echolocation Experts

Neural Correlates of Natural Human Echolocation in Early and Late Blind Echolocation Experts

Daniel Kish has been blind since he was a baby but that hasn't stopped him living an incredibly active life that includes hiking and mountain-biking. To do this, he has perfected a form of human echolocation, using reflected sound waves to build a mental picture of his surroundings.

Using echoes to navigate the world

[Article] Human echolocation: Using tongue-clicks to navigate the world. William Kremer, BBC World Service. How Daniel Kish navigates the world in spite of blindness.

Author summary Echolocation is the ability to use sound-echoes to infer spatial information about the environment. It is well known from certain species of bats or marine mammals. Remarkably, some blind people have developed extraordinary proficiency in echolocation using mouth-clicks. Human echolocation work has built on scant theoretical foundations to date. The current report characterizes the transmission (i.e. mouth click) that people use for echolocation, and in this way provides data…

Author summary Echolocation is the ability to use sound-echoes to infer spatial information about the environment. It is well known from certain species of bats or marine mammals. Remarkably, some blind people have developed extraordinary proficiency in echolocation using mouth-clicks. Human echolocation work has built on scant theoretical foundations to date. The current report characterizes the transmission (i.e. mouth click) that people use for echolocation, and in this way provides data…

How Does Human Echolocation Work?

How Does Human Echolocation Work?

Human Echolocation, Innovation

Exploring the Potential of Human Echolocation

A new study considers how echolocation can benefit visually impaired people to navigate safely through the environment.

Human echolocation lets blind man 'see'

Blind man uses his ears to see

Can a series of sounds help a blind man, in a sense, see? Daniel Kish takes CNN on a road-test of his echolocation.

Human echolocation - Daniel Kish, "Batman" - YouTube

Human echolocation - Daniel Kish, "Batman" - Seeing without sight Daniel Kish is famous for his abilities to see using sound, despite being totally blind.

Patent US7957224 - Human echolocation system - Google Patents

Patent US7957224 - Human echolocation system - Google Patents

echolocation-bats

Top 10 Weird Facts About Bats

Like bats and the Marvel character Daredevil, users can determine the location of objects in the environment by use of reflected sound waves, whether generated by the character or ambient sound. Also known as sonar or radar.

Human echolocation: Using tongue-clicks to navigate the world

Using echoes to navigate the world

Human echolocation: Using tongue-clicks to navigate the world

Human echolocation - Daniel Kish, "Batman"

Human echolocation - Daniel Kish, "Batman" - Seeing without sight Daniel Kish is famous for his abilities to see using sound, despite being totally blind.

Natural Human Echolocation in Early and Late Blind Echolocation Experts

Neural Correlates of Natural Human Echolocation in Early and Late Blind Echolocation Experts

Much like bats and dolphins, some people have developed the ability to analyze bouncing sound waves to generate a picture of their environment. Advanced echolocators have shown increased mental activity in parts of the brain usually devoted for vision. | How Human Echolocation Allows People to See Without Using Their Eyes

How Human Echolocation Allows People to See Without Using Their Eyes

Researchers find humans process echo location and echo suppression differently

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