Hugh Capet, King of France  | hugh capet king of france hugh capet is buried at

Hugh Capet, King of France | hugh capet king of france hugh capet is buried at

Denier of Hugh Capet for Beauvais He is regarded as the founder of the Capetian dynasty. The direct Capetians, or the House of Capet, ruled France from 987 to 1328; thereafter, the Kingdom was ruled by cadet branches of the dynasty. All French kings through Louis Philippe, and all royals since then, have belonged to the dynasty. Furthermore, cadet branches of the House continue to reign in Spain and Luxembourg.

Denier of Hugh Capet for Beauvais He is regarded as the founder of the Capetian dynasty. The direct Capetians, or the House of Capet, ruled France from 987 to 1328; thereafter, the Kingdom was ruled by cadet branches of the dynasty. All French kings through Louis Philippe, and all royals since then, have belonged to the dynasty. Furthermore, cadet branches of the House continue to reign in Spain and Luxembourg.

Hugh Capet, King of the Franks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hugh Capet, King of the Franks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

King Hugh Capet.  Born in Paris, France, circa 939 and died October 24, 996.   He was the first king of France from 987 to 996 and the first of a direct line of 14   Capetian kings. The Capetian dynasty derived its name from his nickname, capa.   Upon his father's death, Capet inherited massive swaths of land around   Paris. The Capetian lineage ruled over 300 years and its unending reign   gives Hugh Capet's rule a greater significance   than his   actual achievements merit.

King Hugh Capet. Born in Paris, France, circa 939 and died October 24, 996. He was the first king of France from 987 to 996 and the first of a direct line of 14 Capetian kings. The Capetian dynasty derived its name from his nickname, capa. Upon his father's death, Capet inherited massive swaths of land around Paris. The Capetian lineage ruled over 300 years and its unending reign gives Hugh Capet's rule a greater significance than his actual achievements merit.

The son of Hugh the Great, Duke of France, and Hedwige of Saxony, daughter of the German king Henry the Fowler, Hugh was born in 941.[2] His paternal family, the Robertians, were powerful landowners in the Île-de-France.[3] His grandfather had been King Robert I.[3] His grandmother Beatrice was a Carolingian, a daughter of Herbert I of Vermandois.[2] This makes him the fifth great-grandson of Charlemagne through Pepin of Italy.[4] King Odo was his grand-uncle and King Rudolph the son-in-law…

The son of Hugh the Great, Duke of France, and Hedwige of Saxony, daughter of the German king Henry the Fowler, Hugh was born in 941.[2] His paternal family, the Robertians, were powerful landowners in the Île-de-France.[3] His grandfather had been King Robert I.[3] His grandmother Beatrice was a Carolingian, a daughter of Herbert I of Vermandois.[2] This makes him the fifth great-grandson of Charlemagne through Pepin of Italy.[4] King Odo was his grand-uncle and King Rudolph the son-in-law…

Adelaide of Aquitaine (945/952 - 1004). Also known as Adele or Adbelahide. Queen of France from 987 to 996. She married Hugh Capet and had three children. My 34th Great Grandmother.

Adelaide of Aquitaine (945/952 - 1004). Also known as Adele or Adbelahide. Queen of France from 987 to 996. She married Hugh Capet and had three children. My 34th Great Grandmother.

Hugh Capet// A denier of Hugh Capet when he was Duke of France, calling him "duke by the grace of God" (Dux Dei Gratia). Minted at Paris (Parisi Civita). Most historians regard the beginnings of modern France with the coronation of Hugh Capet. This is because, as Count of Paris, he made the city his power center. The monarch began a long process of exerting control of the rest of the country from there.

Hugh Capet// A denier of Hugh Capet when he was Duke of France, calling him "duke by the grace of God" (Dux Dei Gratia). Minted at Paris (Parisi Civita). Most historians regard the beginnings of modern France with the coronation of Hugh Capet. This is because, as Count of Paris, he made the city his power center. The monarch began a long process of exerting control of the rest of the country from there.

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