From left to right: Homo habilis, Homo Sapiens, Homo floresiensis, Homo Erectus, Paranthropus boisei, Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis

From left to right: Homo habilis, Homo Sapiens, Homo floresiensis, Homo Erectus, Paranthropus boisei, Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis

Homo Heidelbergensis Reconstruction (Tim Evanson)

Homo Heidelbergensis

Homo Heidelbergensis Reconstruction (Tim Evanson)

Homo Heidelbergensis Skull

Homo Heidelbergensis

Homo Heidelbergensis Skull

Atapuerca foto. Algunos de los restos más emblemáticos procedentes de la Sima de los Huesos, atribuidos a la especie 'Homo heidelbergensis'

Atapuerca foto. Algunos de los restos más emblemáticos procedentes de la Sima de los Huesos, atribuidos a la especie 'Homo heidelbergensis'

Homo Heidelbergensis - Ancient History Encyclopedia

Homo Heidelbergensis

Homo Heidelbergensis - Ancient History Encyclopedia

Australopithecus robustus, homo habilis, homo erectus, homo sapiens neanderthalensis, homo sapiens sapiens all walking to show their height and structure, as well as diagrams of their brains above each with the cortex coloured, to show how the brain increased in size.

Australopithecus robustus, homo habilis, homo erectus, homo sapiens neanderthalensis, homo sapiens sapiens all walking to show their height and structure, as well as diagrams of their brains above each with the cortex coloured, to show how the brain increased in size.

Humans were able to talk 300,000 years ago, new research has shown.  Pre-Neanderthals who lived in northern Spain could utter basic vowel sounds. The findings are based on studies of a complete skull found in the Sima de los Huesos (Pit of Bones) in Atapuerca in 1992 among the remains of over thirty other people. The now famous skull, Atapuerca 5, belongs to a member of the species Homo heidelbergensis, which was the last common ancestor of the Neanderthals and today's humans.

Humans were able to talk 300,000 years ago, new research has shown. Pre-Neanderthals who lived in northern Spain could utter basic vowel sounds. The findings are based on studies of a complete skull found in the Sima de los Huesos (Pit of Bones) in Atapuerca in 1992 among the remains of over thirty other people. The now famous skull, Atapuerca 5, belongs to a member of the species Homo heidelbergensis, which was the last common ancestor of the Neanderthals and today's humans.

So far we have unearthed fossil evidence from more than 20 different human-like species, known as hominins, who are more closely related to humans than any of the apes alive today.     Meet some of our oldest relatives below and discover what insights they can provide about our own evolution.

So far we have unearthed fossil evidence from more than 20 different human-like species, known as hominins, who are more closely related to humans than any of the apes alive today. Meet some of our oldest relatives below and discover what insights they can provide about our own evolution.

Homo heidelbergensis Lived: Europe; possibly Asia and Africa  When:  About 700,000 to 200,000 years ago

Homo heidelbergensis Lived: Europe; possibly Asia and Africa When: About 700,000 to 200,000 years ago

Homo heidelbergensis lived around 600,000 to 250,000 years ago. They were distinctly human in physique and behaviour and evidence suggests these ancient people were accomplished tool makers and could skillfully butcher large animals.

Homo heidelbergensis lived around 600,000 to 250,000 years ago. They were distinctly human in physique and behaviour and evidence suggests these ancient people were accomplished tool makers and could skillfully butcher large animals.

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