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During both World Wars, many civilian women took up jobs in agriculture, replacing those men who went to war. The women who worked for the Women's Land Army (WLA) were commonly known as Land Girls. In forestry, Women's Timber Corps were known as Lumber Jills. At the height of the First World War the Land Army had a full-time membership of 23,000 members. The number exceeded 80,000 during the Second World War.

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At harvest time, Harlow Common (1943). Follow link to read Mary's story.The land girls were formed in 1939 to do the jobs on farms for the men gone off to war. This is England .We had the same in the U.S.

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A photograph of a farm worker bringing in the harvest, Sussex, taken in July 1937 by Edward G Malindine for the Daily Herald.

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Workers of the Women's Land Army (Land Girls) with a spaniel during a lunch break on a farm in Sevenoaks, Kent - 1942

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BATTLE OF THE LAND: THE WORK OF THE WOMEN'S LAND ARMY ON THE BRITISH HOME FRONT, 1942 | Imperial War Museums

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Infographic: Charting the history of agriculture and climate change. The infographic was created by Farming First, a coalition of farmers associations, engineers and scientists, in partnership with the CGIAR Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program (CCAFS) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).

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The development of civilisation has relied heavily on the discovery of metals. Prehistoric man used metals to build tools and weapons and as our knowl

The development of civilisation has relied heavily on the discovery of metals. Prehistoric man used metals to build tools and weapons and as our knowl

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from Mail Online

Revealed: Britain's secret treasure trove of stone age rock art

Revealed after 5,000 years by a team of English Heritage volunteers at Buttony, Northumberland Kate Wilson, inspector of ancient monuments at English Heritage, said: 'They may have a spiritual significance. She said that the Neolithic Age saw the arrival of 'a fairly sophisticated culture', with the introduction of agriculture. 'They were settling and cultivating something,' she added.

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Caernarfon Castle is located at the southern end of the Menai Strait between north Wales and Anglesey. During Edward I's invasions of Wales, this was strategically an excellent place to build a castle; Anglesey was referred to as the garden of Wales, providing agriculturally rich land close to the poorer land on north Wales. The Menai Strait also allowed speedy access between the north Welsh coast and the western coast, and was therefore important for Edward to control.

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