The "shadow" of a Hiroshima victim, permanently etched into stone steps, after the 1945 atomic bomb

The "shadow" of a Hiroshima victim, permanently etched into stone steps, after the 1945 atomic bomb

Hiroshima victims  Bodies of the victims of the first American atomic bombing on August 06, 1945 in Hiroshima. (APIC via Getty Images)

Hiroshima victims Bodies of the victims of the first American atomic bombing on August 06, 1945 in Hiroshima. (APIC via Getty Images)

Hiroshima victims in Sept 1945. Note the woman's face with an extensive burn from the blast.

Hiroshima victims in Sept 1945. Note the woman's face with an extensive burn from the blast.

Hiroshima: The bomb detonated directly over Shima Surgical Clinic at 34.39468°N 132.45462°E. "Within hours, the enormity of the attacks had become apparent; long queues formed at first aid stations and hospitals, but most of the Atomic Bomb Victims with third-degree burns were unable to reach first aid stations and died on the way"   Ryoko Ohara

Hiroshima: The bomb detonated directly over Shima Surgical Clinic at 34.39468°N 132.45462°E. "Within hours, the enormity of the attacks had become apparent; long queues formed at first aid stations and hospitals, but most of the Atomic Bomb Victims with third-degree burns were unable to reach first aid stations and died on the way" Ryoko Ohara

On the beautiful, sunny morning of 6 August 1945, an American B29 bomber, Enola Gay, flew above the skies of Hiroshima. Shortly afterwards, 145,000 people were dead. View film: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/hiroshima-date-with-history

On the beautiful, sunny morning of 6 August 1945, an American B29 bomber, Enola Gay, flew above the skies of Hiroshima. Shortly afterwards, 145,000 people were dead. View film: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/hiroshima-date-with-history

Formation of keloidal scars on the back and shoulder of a victim of the Hiroshima blast. The scars have formed where the victim's skin was directly exposed to the heat of the explosion's initial flash. (U.S. National Archives)

Formation of keloidal scars on the back and shoulder of a victim of the Hiroshima blast. The scars have formed where the victim's skin was directly exposed to the heat of the explosion's initial flash. (U.S. National Archives)

During World War II, the bombing of Tokyo and other cities in Japan caused widespread destruction and hundreds of thousands of deaths. On Monday, August 6, 1945, the nuclear bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima by an American B-29 bomber, the Enola Gay, flown by Colonel Paul Tibbets, killing about 80,000 people. There were six surviving victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, called hibakusha.

During World War II, the bombing of Tokyo and other cities in Japan caused widespread destruction and hundreds of thousands of deaths. On Monday, August 6, 1945, the nuclear bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima by an American B-29 bomber, the Enola Gay, flown by Colonel Paul Tibbets, killing about 80,000 people. There were six surviving victims of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, called hibakusha.

Nagasaki and Hiroshima victims; mass skulls

Nagasaki and Hiroshima victims; mass skulls

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