Greek wrestling was the most popular organized sport in Ancient Greece. A point was scored when one player touched the ground with his back, hip, shoulder, or tapped out due to a submission-hold or was forced out of the wrestling-area. Three points had to be scored to win the match.

Greek wrestling was the most popular organized sport in Ancient Greece. A point was scored when one player touched the ground with his back, hip, shoulder, or tapped out due to a submission-hold or was forced out of the wrestling-area. Three points had to be scored to win the match.

Greek Wrestling- was the faavorite Ancient Greek sport. 3 points were needed to win the match. It was the first sport added to the Olympics that wasn't a race.

Greek Wrestling- was the faavorite Ancient Greek sport. 3 points were needed to win the match. It was the first sport added to the Olympics that wasn't a race.

The Greeks liked their boys young.  It was as adolescents that males were found attractive by other men. A boy’s sexual allure began to diminish the moment he started to grow facial and body hair and this short window of attractiveness perhaps explains the ecstatic reception that poster-boy youths like Charmides received. According to Plato, everyone at the wrestling school gazes at Charmides “as if he were a statue” and Socrates himself “catches fire” when he sees him...

The Greeks liked their boys young. It was as adolescents that males were found attractive by other men. A boy’s sexual allure began to diminish the moment he started to grow facial and body hair and this short window of attractiveness perhaps explains the ecstatic reception that poster-boy youths like Charmides received. According to Plato, everyone at the wrestling school gazes at Charmides “as if he were a statue” and Socrates himself “catches fire” when he sees him...

A wrestler lifts his opponent off the ground, holding him firmly in his grasp, in this 6-inch-tall, second-century B.C.E. bronze statuette discovered in Alexandria, Egypt. The philosopher Plato (427-347 B.C.E.) encouraged Athens’s youth to wrestle, and the historian Plutarch (c. 46-120 C.E.), in his Quaestiones conviviales, calls wrestling “the most technical and the trickiest” of sports. A Greek wrestling manual, dating to the first or second century C.E.,

A wrestler lifts his opponent off the ground, holding him firmly in his grasp, in this 6-inch-tall, second-century B.C.E. bronze statuette discovered in Alexandria, Egypt. The philosopher Plato (427-347 B.C.E.) encouraged Athens’s youth to wrestle, and the historian Plutarch (c. 46-120 C.E.), in his Quaestiones conviviales, calls wrestling “the most technical and the trickiest” of sports. A Greek wrestling manual, dating to the first or second century C.E.,

Ancient Greek wrestling matches  - Papyrus

Ancient Greek wrestling matches - Papyrus

Papyrus describes ancient Greek wrestling match – and it was FIXED

Papyrus describes ancient Greek wrestling match – and it was FIXED

The contract was discovered in Oxyrhynchus, in Egypt a century ago and has only just been translated by an expert at Kings College London.

Lewis W. Hine (American, 1874 – 1940) Greek Wrestling Club From the series Hull House, Chicago c. 1910

Lewis W. Hine (American, 1874 – 1940) Greek Wrestling Club From the series Hull House, Chicago c. 1910

Greek Wrestling     Credit: Photo courtesy Walters Art Museum, through Wikimedia, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 Unported    Flavillianus also excelled at wrestling. Unlike modern-day versions of the sport, the goal wasn't to pin your opponent but simply to throw him onto the ground. Whoever threw their opponent three times first won the contest. Shown here, a solid-cast bronze artifact from the second century B.C.

Image Gallery: Combat Sports in Ancient Rome

Greek Wrestling Credit: Photo courtesy Walters Art Museum, through Wikimedia, CC Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 Unported Flavillianus also excelled at wrestling. Unlike modern-day versions of the sport, the goal wasn't to pin your opponent but simply to throw him onto the ground. Whoever threw their opponent three times first won the contest. Shown here, a solid-cast bronze artifact from the second century B.C.

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