Great_plague_of_london-1665

Religious Conservatives Protest The Enlightenment

With ebola spreading across West Africa, the parallels between the modern affliction and the plague of the Middle Ages is unavoidable. Now cured by simple antibiotics, the plague at one time ravaged most of the classical world

Ring Around The Rosie. This rhyme dates back to the Great Plague of London in 1665. The symptoms of bubonic plague included a rosy red ring-shaped rash, which inspired the first line. It was believed that the disease was carried by bad smells, so people frequently carried pockets full of fresh herbs, or "posies." The "ashes, ashes" line is believed to refer to the cremation of the bodies of those who died from the plague.

Black and white stock photograph of a group of little children plaing ring around a rosie in the street, New York, Picture of Children Playing Ring Around a Rosie.

During the Black Death & the Great Plague, doctors who visited plague victims donned a mask which resembled a vulture's beak with glass eye openings & two small nose holes. It served as a type of respirator & contained aromatic items such as dried flowers, spices, herbs, or a vinegar sponge. Historians have attributed the invention of the "beak doctor" costume to Charles de Lorme, who adopted the full head-to-toe protective garment in 1619, modeled after a soldier's armour.

doctor during the plague years, an artistic depiction of their masks. "During the period of the Black Death and the Great Plague of London, plague doctors visited victims of the plague.

Plague Bell ca.1665 from Museum of London. Rules were gradually added over the years, such as putting a cross on the door of plague-ridden houses, only burying the dead at night, and ringing a bell like this one for 45 minutes for each burial. The noise of bells ringing during burials was meant to remind people to follow the plague prevention rules.

Plague bell from the great plague of Rang to warn people to stay away from you when you had "The Plague!

The Plague bacteria (Yersinia pestis) which causes bubonic plague, thought to be the Black Death of Europe in the mid-14th century, and also the Great Plague of London in 1664-1665

As pretty as a picture (but a lot more deadly): Killer diseases as you've never seen them before

Stop Superbugs Naturally - The Plague bacteria (Yersinia pestis) which causes bubonic plague, thought to be the Black Death of Europe in the century, and also the Great Plague of London in

Old Saint Paul’s: A Tale of the Plague and the Fire. London: Parry, Blenkarn & Co., 1847. London: Printed for W. Nicoll, 1769. From the hold...

Old Saint Paul’s: A Tale of the Plague and the Fire. London: Parry, Blenkarn & Co., London: Printed for W. Nicoll, From the holdings of Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library—Harvard College Library

The Great Fire of London began in a baker's shop in Pudding Lane, on this day 2nd September, 1666 and rapidly spread throughout the city

Probably the most famous disaster in its history, the Great Fire of London shaped the city we know today. Here are the facts via a handy infographic!

The Black Death, one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, spread across Europe between 1346 and 1353. It is widely believed that the plague

In the Middle Ages, devil-fearing Christians killed cats, which carried the unintended consequence of increasing the rat population and the spread of the Black Death

Plague Masks. During the period of the Black Death and the Great Plague of London, plague doctors visited victims of the plague to verify whether they have been afflicted or not. The beak was stuffed with spices or herbs to "purify" the air that the doctor breathed.  It has been questioned how much this costume was actually worn; the greater part of doctors fled the cities in the early stages of the plague.    Source: http://www.facebook.com/ICannotGotoBed

BB: Masks worn by doctors during the Plague. The protective suit of the plague doctor consisted of a heavy fabric overcoat that was waxed, a mask with glass eye openings and a cone nose shaped like a beak to hold scented substances and straw.

Toads Around Your Neck and Forcing Kids to Smoke- Escaping The Great Plague of London (1665-1666)

Toads Around Your Neck and Forcing Kids to Smoke- Escaping The Great Plague of London

In sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London, in response to recurrent epidemics of bubonic plague, authorities instituted the tradition of publishing a Bill of Mortality each week. The “Great Plague of London,” which hit the city in the summer of 1665, is estimated to have killed between 75,000 and 100,000 Londoners. This page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of August 15-22, 1665, when the plague had infected ninety-six of the 130 parishes reporting.

How Londoners Died in One Plague-Ridden Week in 1665

How Londoners Died in One Plague-Ridden Week in page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of Aug. when the plague had infected 96 of the 130 parishes reporting.

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