Grave & Monument to Lord Francis Nathaniel Conyngham

Grave & Monument to Lord Francis Nathaniel Conyngham

Vimy Memorial.   Notice the seam of the blocks below cutting through the drapery of the sculpture base.

Vimy Memorial. Notice the seam of the blocks below cutting through the drapery of the sculpture base.

White ground oil flask (lekythos) depicting a grave monument for... about 450–440 B.C. Painter Thanatos Painter Greek Athletes | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

White ground oil flask (lekythos) depicting a grave monument for... about 450–440 B.C. Painter Thanatos Painter Greek Athletes | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Crowning Decoration for a Grave Monument , Greek, about 320 B.C. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Crowning Decoration for a Grave Monument , Greek, about 320 B.C. The J. Paul Getty Museum

This kouros served as a grave marker and was accompanied by the following inscription: "Stand and pity beside the grave monument of dead Kroisos, whom, at one time, while fighting in the front ranks of battle, raging Ares destroyed".

This kouros served as a grave marker and was accompanied by the following inscription: "Stand and pity beside the grave monument of dead Kroisos, whom, at one time, while fighting in the front ranks of battle, raging Ares destroyed".

Siren with a Kithara from a Grave Monument. This expressive figure of a mournful siren playing the kithara, a musical instrument like a lyre, originally crowned a funerary monument. Sirens were mythical creatures that were part-woman, part-bird, who, while best known as temptresses, also used their powers of song to praise men of great fame, and thus appear frequently on funerary monuments of the 4th century. 2nd half 4th century BC (Classical)

Siren with a Kithara from a Grave Monument. This expressive figure of a mournful siren playing the kithara, a musical instrument like a lyre, originally crowned a funerary monument. Sirens were mythical creatures that were part-woman, part-bird, who, while best known as temptresses, also used their powers of song to praise men of great fame, and thus appear frequently on funerary monuments of the 4th century. 2nd half 4th century BC (Classical)

why are grave monument carvings in museums? are tombstones in museums? disgusting how these peoples sacred items were stolen for display in some rich assholes curiosity chest...

why are grave monument carvings in museums? are tombstones in museums? disgusting how these peoples sacred items were stolen for display in some rich assholes curiosity chest...

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