Slap-soled shoes belonging to Frances Walsingham, lady in waiting to Elizabeth I, and daughter of her spymaster, Francis Walsingham.

Slap-soled shoes belonging to Frances Walsingham, lady in waiting to Elizabeth I, and daughter of her spymaster, Francis Walsingham. Though the shoes belong to a Canadian collector, they are considered so important to British history that they have to be

Sir Francis Walsingham – Elizabeth’s Spymaster

Sir Francis Walsingham – Elizabeth’s Spymaster

Geoffrey Rush as Sir Francis Walsingham

Geoffrey Rush as Sir Francis Walsingham

Engraving of Queen Elizabeth I, William Cecil and Sir Francis Walsingham, by William Faithorne, 1655

queen elizabeth i, sir francis walsingham, william cecil baron burghley by william faithorne

very in depth history of Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth I spymaster and so much more

Sir Francis Walsingham (c. 1532 – 6 April was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England from 20 December 1573 until his death, and is popularly remembered as her "spymaster". - my great grandfather on my mother's side

Sir Francis Walsingham, Secretary of State and Spymaster to HM Elizabeth I  ~ by John De Critz the Elder

Sir Francis Walsingham by John De Critz the Elder principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England

From 1.75 Elizabeth's Spymaster: Francis Walsingham And The Secret War That Saved England

Elizabeth's Spymaster: Francis Walsingham And The Secret War That Saved England

From 1.75 Elizabeth's Spymaster: Francis Walsingham And The Secret War That Saved England

The smoking gun in the Babington Plot which sealed Mary, the so-called Queen of Scots' fate. Sir Francis Walsingham and his associates broke Mary Stuart's cipher without much difficulty.

The smoking gun in the Babington Plot which sealed Mary, Queen of Scots' fate. Sir Francis Walsingham and his associates broke Mary Stuart's cipher without much difficulty.

Anthony Babington, catholic conspirator, who leaded other six gentleman in the attempt of murdering Elizabeth I to replace her with Mary Queen of Scots. The plot, wich was named after him, was foiled by Elizabeth's spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham. Babington was sentenced to death for high treason and executed on 18th September, 1586. The Babington plot was also the  cause of Mary Stuart's execution.

Sir Christopher Hatton Sir Christopher Hatton – 20 November was an English politician, the lord chancellor of England and, according to speculation, the lover of Queen Elizabeth I.

Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State and Spymaster.  Painted by John De Critz the Elder.

Sir Francis Walsingham by John De Critz the Elder. Walsingham was principal secretary to Elizabeth I and is remembered as spymaster, having uncovered several plots against the Queens life.

1594 - Frances Walsingham, Countess of Essex, and her son Robert, later the third Earl of Essex, by Robert Peake the elder.   Inscribed top right "1594 AEte 36", over the child's head "AEte 5" Attributed to Robert Peake

Robert Devereux as a child with his mother Frances Walsingham, countess of Essex by Robert Peake the elder, 1594

Family group of the Tudors with the figures of War, Peace and Plenty

"Allegory of the Tudor Succession", c. to Lucas de Heere. Left to right: Philip and Mary with War, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Elizabeth I with Peace and Plenty

Portrait of Sir Francis Walsingham (c.1530–1590), MP, as Chancellor of the Order of the Garter. By/ attributed to Hieronymus Custodis, c.1585–1588. Oil on panel, 77.5 x 62 cm. National Trust, Kingston Lacy.

Sir Francis Walsingham MP, Chancellor of the Order of the Garter or Sir John Wolley MP, Chancellor of t.

Anders Lustgarten's compelling play takes its title from John le Carre's contention that “Espionage is the secret theatre of our society”. It finds in the spy network around Elizabeth I an image of our own surveillance state and in the spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham, the classic case of a man whose obsessive concern for security leads him to sacrifice too much to ensure the country's safety, institutionalising fear.

The Secret Theatre, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, London, review: a compelling spy thriller set in Elizabeth I's court

Anders Lustgarten's compelling play takes its title from John le Carre's contention that “Espionage is the secret theatre of our society”. It finds in the spy network around Elizabeth I an image of our own surveillance state and in the spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham, the classic case of a man whose obsessive concern for security leads him to sacrifice too much to ensure the country's safety, institutionalising fear.

Sir Francis Walsingham was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth from 1573 to 1590

Visit this site providing Picture of Francis Walsingham the famous Statesman. Striking and Unusual Picture of Francis Walsingham. Picture of Francis Walsingham of Elizabethan times.

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