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using apple cider vinegar for natural flea prevention and control

Fleas can be a big problem for dogs and cats, especially during summer months, but there is a bigger problem: the commercial chemical-laden treatments that–in my opinion–do more harm than good. Flea collars, sprays, powders, shampoos and the like may be mildly effective, but the dangers outweigh the benefits. As your skin does, your pet's skin absorbs everything you put on it, so topical treatments make their way into the bloodstream. If the products are filled with chemicals (most of them…

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DIY flea treatment! I found this and tried it. Just take a spray bottle, put in 1/2 tea spoon of salt, add 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda. Mix 4oz of warm water and 8oz of apple cider vinegar. Once the apple cider vinegar and water is mixed, SLOWLY pour it into the spray bottle with the salt and baking soda already in it. Make sure to pour slowly, it will react. Spray on carpets, furniture, stuffed toys and pets. Be careful not to get it in pets eyes. Works like a charm! by Jen Diggan

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Give a teaspoon of coconut oil per 10 pounds of dog, or you can give a tablespoon per 30 pounds. Start with about 1/4 the recommended dosage and build up to the recommended level over 3-4 weeks.

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I personally would start with half of the listed doseage for about a month....then go to full doseage................Coconut Oil for Pets: The Benefits and Uses of Coconut Oil for Cats, Dogs, Birds!

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'Old Tom Gin' is a sweet gin recipe popular in 18th-century England, now rarely available. Early 1700s home production of Gin was encouraged because it was safer than drinking water and landowners produced it as a by-product of grain, taxes were low. Gin was less costly than beer and ale and it became synonymous with the poor and abuse of the drink was rampant. This caused outrage and legislative backlash. In the 1870's Dry Gin was introduced and it became a more refined drink in high…

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