The Etruscan language has been difficult to analyze, as It resembles no other language in Europe or elsewhere. The Etruscan language was spoken and written by the Etruscan civilization in the ancient region of Etruria (modern Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls). Etruscan was superseded by Latin, leaving only a few documents and some loanwords in Latin like Roma.

The Etruscan language has been difficult to analyze, as It resembles no other language in Europe or elsewhere. The Etruscan language was spoken and written by the Etruscan civilization in the ancient region of Etruria (modern Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls). Etruscan was superseded by Latin, leaving only a few documents and some loanwords in Latin like Roma.

The ancestry of the Roman alphabet from Kemetic (Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs) to Semetic (early Hebrew) to Phoenician to Greek. (J, U, and W were late additions to the Roman alphabet.) The Ancient Egyptian name for their own writing system was "Metu Neter" - meaning divine speech. "Hieroglyphs" is a Greek word - "hieros" means "sacred", "glyph" means writing.

The ancestry of the Roman alphabet from Kemetic (Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs) to Semetic (early Hebrew) to Phoenician to Greek. (J, U, and W were late additions to the Roman alphabet.) The Ancient Egyptian name for their own writing system was "Metu Neter" - meaning divine speech. "Hieroglyphs" is a Greek word - "hieros" means "sacred", "glyph" means writing.

The RAS'NA (Etruscan) Alphabet. The Etruscan language is universally accepted as an isolated case. It cannot be shown conclusively to be related to any other language, living or dead, except for a couple of sparsely attested extinct languages.  Here they used ancient Greek an Phoenicians signs to fit their still mysterious language..

The RAS'NA (Etruscan) Alphabet. The Etruscan language is universally accepted as an isolated case. It cannot be shown conclusively to be related to any other language, living or dead, except for a couple of sparsely attested extinct languages. Here they used ancient Greek an Phoenicians signs to fit their still mysterious language..

Researchers found the inscribed slab near Florence and believe it might hold secrets behind the language of Italy's pre-Roman culture

2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language

Researchers found the inscribed slab near Florence and believe it might hold secrets behind the language of Italy's pre-Roman culture

Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess.

Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess.

A 500-pound stone tablet found in the foundation of an Etruscan temple at the Poggio Colla site in Tuscany.... Archaeologists strongly suspect that the text is religious, but have yet to fully translate the find.

'Extraordinary Find': Rare Religious Text Written in Lost Etruscan Language

A 500-pound stone tablet found in the foundation of an Etruscan temple at the Poggio Colla site in Tuscany.... Archaeologists strongly suspect that the text is religious, but have yet to fully translate the find.

2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language | Smart News | Smithsonian

2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language

2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language | Smart News | Smithsonian

Dating back to 500 B.C., the Pyrgi gold tablets were discovered in 1964 in an excavation of a sanctuary in ancient Pyrgi, the port of the southern Etruscan town of Caere in Italy. The three gold plates contain holes around their edges, which indicate that they were likely bound together in some form at one point. What makes the tablets so special is that they are bilingual. Two of the tablets are inscribed in the Etruscan language, the third in Phoenician and are today regarded as the oldest…

Dating back to 500 B.C., the Pyrgi gold tablets were discovered in 1964 in an excavation of a sanctuary in ancient Pyrgi, the port of the southern Etruscan town of Caere in Italy. The three gold plates contain holes around their edges, which indicate that they were likely bound together in some form at one point. What makes the tablets so special is that they are bilingual. Two of the tablets are inscribed in the Etruscan language, the third in Phoenician and are today regarded as the oldest…

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