TR learned of the death of his youngest son Quentin in July of 1918. Quentin, a fighter pilot for the US Army Air Corps in WW1, was shot down behind enemy lines.    "Grandfather" Roosevelt hugs baby granddaughter Edith Roosevelt Derby, 1918.

TR learned of the death of his youngest son Quentin in July of 1918. Quentin, a fighter pilot for the US Army Air Corps in WW1, was shot down behind enemy lines. "Grandfather" Roosevelt hugs baby granddaughter Edith Roosevelt Derby, 1918.

EDITH ROOSEVELT WOMEN OF WASHINGTON DC WIVES ANTIQUE NEWS MAGAZINE POSTER PRINT

Edith roosevelt women of washington dc wives antique news magazine poster print

Edith Kermit Carow knew Theodore Roosevelt from infancy

Edith Roosevelt

Edith Kermit Carow knew Theodore Roosevelt from infancy

#26 Edith Kermit (Carow) Roosevelt was born August 6, 1861 in Norwich, CT, and died September 30, 1948 in Oyster Bay, NY. She served as 27th First Lady of the United States from September 14, 1901 to March 4, 1909, with her husband, Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States.

#26 Edith Kermit (Carow) Roosevelt was born August 6, 1861 in Norwich, CT, and died September 30, 1948 in Oyster Bay, NY. She served as 27th First Lady of the United States from September 14, 1901 to March 4, 1909, with her husband, Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States.

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt  A portrait of First Lady Edith Roosevelt, wife of President Theodore Roosevelt

First Ladies Picture Gallery

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt A portrait of First Lady Edith Roosevelt, wife of President Theodore Roosevelt

The Smithsonian’s First Lady collection came to be soon after Edith Roosevelt, wife of Teddy Roosevelt, left the White House. When the museum’s advocates asked her for a contribution, Roosevelt said that she wasn’t sure she could help: she often cut up dresses for the material after she wore them. Turns out her inaugural gown was no exception. Her daughter later donated the remaining bottom half, and the Smithsonian refashioned the bodice using photographs. (From 1905)

Edith Roosevelt, 1905: A Practical Matter

The Smithsonian’s First Lady collection came to be soon after Edith Roosevelt, wife of Teddy Roosevelt, left the White House. When the museum’s advocates asked her for a contribution, Roosevelt said that she wasn’t sure she could help: she often cut up dresses for the material after she wore them. Turns out her inaugural gown was no exception. Her daughter later donated the remaining bottom half, and the Smithsonian refashioned the bodice using photographs. (From 1905)

President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt in 1908.

President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt in 1908.

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948) was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt and served as First Lady of the United States during his presidency from 1901 to 1909.  wem

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948) was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt and served as First Lady of the United States during his presidency from 1901 to 1909. wem

Photo of Edith Roosevelt with son, Quentin, from the "First Ladies: Political Role and Public Image" exhibition. Edith Roosevelt did not share her husband’s thirst for publicity, but knowing she must deal with the press, she injected both decorum and whimsy into coverage of her rambunctious family. She screened photographers, oversaw the selection of photographs, chose the magazines in which they would appear, and selected authors to write the stories. Courtesy Library of Congress…

Photo of Edith Roosevelt with son, Quentin, from the "First Ladies: Political Role and Public Image" exhibition. Edith Roosevelt did not share her husband’s thirst for publicity, but knowing she must deal with the press, she injected both decorum and whimsy into coverage of her rambunctious family. She screened photographers, oversaw the selection of photographs, chose the magazines in which they would appear, and selected authors to write the stories. Courtesy Library of Congress…

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