The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity. It marked the end of the religious wars that had afflicted France during the second half of the 16th century.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity. It marked the end of the religious wars that had afflicted France during the second half of the 16th century.

Le Château des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes, France.  Where the Edict of Nantes was signed.

Le Château des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes, France. Where the Edict of Nantes was signed.

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

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Logis Barrault in Angers where the Edict of Nantes was signed in 1598 by Henri IV granting civil rights to Protestants in sanctuary cities where they could live in peace, while reaffirming Catholicism as the established religion of France. It would be revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV.

Logis Barrault in Angers where the Edict of Nantes was signed in 1598 by Henri IV granting civil rights to Protestants in sanctuary cities where they could live in peace, while reaffirming Catholicism as the established religion of France. It would be revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV.

The Refugees (1893) is a historical novel by British writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  It revolves around Amory de Catinat, a Huguenot guardsman of Louis XIV, and Amos Green, an American who comes to visit France. Major themes include Louis XIV's marriage to Madame de Maintenon, retirement from court of Madame de Montespan, the revoking of the Edict of Nantes and the subsequent emigration of the Huguenot de Catinats to America

The Refugees (1893) is a historical novel by British writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It revolves around Amory de Catinat, a Huguenot guardsman of Louis XIV, and Amos Green, an American who comes to visit France. Major themes include Louis XIV's marriage to Madame de Maintenon, retirement from court of Madame de Montespan, the revoking of the Edict of Nantes and the subsequent emigration of the Huguenot de Catinats to America

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by  Artist Henry Nadauld 1653 1723. The Empress fountain Chatsworth House.   He was a Huguenot sculptor and carver, responsible for sophisticated decorative carving and statues at two of the great English baroque houses. Nadauld was born in France and after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes fled to England.  His son Pierre, born in 1685 in France, was naturalised in 1707 He became a surgeon and raised a family in Ashford, Derbys.

by Artist Henry Nadauld 1653 1723. The Empress fountain Chatsworth House. He was a Huguenot sculptor and carver, responsible for sophisticated decorative carving and statues at two of the great English baroque houses. Nadauld was born in France and after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes fled to England. His son Pierre, born in 1685 in France, was naturalised in 1707 He became a surgeon and raised a family in Ashford, Derbys.

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Philip the Fair (Philip IV), Henry III and Louis XIII were all born in the palace, and Philip died there. Christina of Sweden lived there for years, following her abdication in 1654. In 1685 Fontainebleau saw the signing of the Edict of Fontainebleau, which revoked the Edict of Nantes (1598). Royal guests of the Bourbon kings were housed at Fontainebleau, including Peter the Great of Russia and Christian VII of Denmark.

Philip the Fair (Philip IV), Henry III and Louis XIII were all born in the palace, and Philip died there. Christina of Sweden lived there for years, following her abdication in 1654. In 1685 Fontainebleau saw the signing of the Edict of Fontainebleau, which revoked the Edict of Nantes (1598). Royal guests of the Bourbon kings were housed at Fontainebleau, including Peter the Great of Russia and Christian VII of Denmark.

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Isaac d’Olier  a Huguenot  escaped to Holland during the Edict of Nantes. French  In 1688, he followed the Prince of Orange to England and then went to Ireland where he became a merchant and married Ms Martha Pilkington from Westmeath. Their only son, Isaac, was a goldsmith and a member of Dublin City Council. His third son, Jeremiah, became one of the first governors of the Bank of Ireland in 1801.  see link for article re Bank of Ireland

Isaac d’Olier a Huguenot escaped to Holland during the Edict of Nantes. French In 1688, he followed the Prince of Orange to England and then went to Ireland where he became a merchant and married Ms Martha Pilkington from Westmeath. Their only son, Isaac, was a goldsmith and a member of Dublin City Council. His third son, Jeremiah, became one of the first governors of the Bank of Ireland in 1801. see link for article re Bank of Ireland

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. On March 4, 1590, Prince Henry of Navarre led Huguenot forces against the Catholic League at the Battle of Ivry  in Normandy, resulting in a decisive victory. Then, on April 13, 1598, as the newly crowned Henry IV, he issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted to the Huguenots toleration and liberty to worship in their own way. For a time, at least, there was more freedom for the Huguenots. However, about one hundred years later, on October 18, 1685, Louis XIV revoked the Edict

. On March 4, 1590, Prince Henry of Navarre led Huguenot forces against the Catholic League at the Battle of Ivry in Normandy, resulting in a decisive victory. Then, on April 13, 1598, as the newly crowned Henry IV, he issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted to the Huguenots toleration and liberty to worship in their own way. For a time, at least, there was more freedom for the Huguenots. However, about one hundred years later, on October 18, 1685, Louis XIV revoked the Edict

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Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

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