The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather.  Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain.  After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England.  From there,  Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

27 février 1594 - Henri IV est sacré à Chartres - Au début de 1594, Henri IV assiège avec succès Dreux puis il est sacré le 27 fév 1594 en la cathédrale de Chartres: il est l'un des 3 roi de France sacrés ailleurs qu'à Reims ou Paris, qui étaient en effet tenus par la Ligue.

27 février 1594 - Henri IV est sacré à Chartres - Au début de 1594, Henri IV assiège avec succès Dreux puis il est sacré le 27 fév 1594 en la cathédrale de Chartres: il est l'un des 3 roi de France sacrés ailleurs qu'à Reims ou Paris, qui étaient en effet tenus par la Ligue.

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors.  Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes.  Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors. Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes. Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

The Edict of Nantes (1598) Henry IV Henry IV  The edict which Henry IV promulgated in Nantes in 1598 offered the Reformed Protestants of France a relatively safe social life and limited freedom of worship.  It was intended to be perpetual, end the Wars of Religion for good and restore peace and internal order to France.  The edict was the written expression of a compromise between the Catholic religion of the state and the confession of a significant minority of the French population.

The Edict of Nantes (1598) Henry IV Henry IV The edict which Henry IV promulgated in Nantes in 1598 offered the Reformed Protestants of France a relatively safe social life and limited freedom of worship. It was intended to be perpetual, end the Wars of Religion for good and restore peace and internal order to France. The edict was the written expression of a compromise between the Catholic religion of the state and the confession of a significant minority of the French population.

Edict of Nantes, granting religious freedoms, commemorated at Chateau des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes

Edict of Nantes, granting religious freedoms, commemorated at Chateau des Ducs de Bretagne in Nantes

Early Hot Water Urn  1702 by Francis Singleton  Huguenot craftsmen began arriving in England following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685. They brought with them innovative styles and techniques that had a profound effect on English design and craftsmanship. Initially, there was little distinction between wares made for tea, coffee and chocolate. This very early example of a hot water urn by the Huguenot, Francis Singleton is made from Britannia Standard silver.

Early Hot Water Urn 1702 by Francis Singleton Huguenot craftsmen began arriving in England following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685. They brought with them innovative styles and techniques that had a profound effect on English design and craftsmanship. Initially, there was little distinction between wares made for tea, coffee and chocolate. This very early example of a hot water urn by the Huguenot, Francis Singleton is made from Britannia Standard silver.

A talented craftsman and an exceptional businessman, Paul de Lamerie was one of the greatest Huguenot silversmiths working in Britain during the eighteenth century. He emigrated from Holland with his family in 1689. Huguenots were French Protestants, many of whom fled from France following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, which withdrew their right to practice their faith. Huguenot silversmiths helped to revolutionize silver in Britain, introducing the newest techniques and…

A talented craftsman and an exceptional businessman, Paul de Lamerie was one of the greatest Huguenot silversmiths working in Britain during the eighteenth century. He emigrated from Holland with his family in 1689. Huguenots were French Protestants, many of whom fled from France following the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, which withdrew their right to practice their faith. Huguenot silversmiths helped to revolutionize silver in Britain, introducing the newest techniques and…

Finally, in October 1685, Louis XIV issued the Edict of Fontainebleau which formally revoked the Edict of Nantes and declared Protestantism illegal in France. This act, more commonly known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, was the culmination of the increasing persecution against the Huguenots and it resulted in the destruction of Huguenot churches, the closure of Protestant schools and increased pressure and intimidation to convert to Catholicism. Those who refused to swear…

Finally, in October 1685, Louis XIV issued the Edict of Fontainebleau which formally revoked the Edict of Nantes and declared Protestantism illegal in France. This act, more commonly known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, was the culmination of the increasing persecution against the Huguenots and it resulted in the destruction of Huguenot churches, the closure of Protestant schools and increased pressure and intimidation to convert to Catholicism. Those who refused to swear…

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