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Suffragettes 'were like al-Qa'eda'

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Nine inspiring lessons the suffragettes can teach feminists today

Emmeline Pankhurst celebrating with Christabel Pankhurst and others after being released from prison. Photograph: Hulton Getty

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'Unknown' entries on Home Office list of suffragettes arrested 1906-1914 (catalogue reference HO 45/24665)

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Why the suffragettes still matter: 'they dared to act as the equals of men'

From left: Emmeline Pankhurst with daughters Christabel and Sylvia at Waterloo station, London, 1911.

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Christabel Pankhurst: 1880-1958; Christabel (daughter of Emmeline Pankhurst) advocated the use of militant tactics to win the vote for women in England. Pankhurst, with Annie Kenney, unfurled a banner reading "Votes for Women" at a Liberal Party meeting in 1905. Her action received world-wide attention after they were thrown out of the meeting. The two were arrested and sent to prison. Christabel then directed a campaign that included physical action, hunger strikes, and huge rallies.

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Annie Kenney, (1879 - 1953) Suffragette who spent three days in prison for daring to ask Churchill and Sir Edward Grey if they believed women should have the right to vote. Neither man replied.

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Advertisement for The Suffragette newspaper. This poster, designed by Mary Bartels, represents the Suffragette as a feminine 'womanly' woman. The Suffragette was launched as the official newspaper of the Women's Social and Political Union in 1912. Its launch represented a split in the Union as Emmeline and Fred Pethick-Lawrence were purged from the leadership by Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. 1914

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