The Burnt Island Light, built in 1821, is the second oldest surviving lighthouse in Maine.[2] It hosts a living history museum run by the state Department of Marine Resources.[4] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Burnt Island Light Station on November 23, 1977, reference number 77000139.

The Burnt Island Light, built in 1821, is the second oldest surviving lighthouse in Maine.[2] It hosts a living history museum run by the state Department of Marine Resources.[4] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Burnt Island Light Station on November 23, 1977, reference number 77000139.

Burnt Island Light-Boothbay Harbor, Maine. Saw this one on a lobster tour twice, both times in the fog.

Burnt Island Light-Boothbay Harbor, Maine. Saw this one on a lobster tour twice, both times in the fog.

Simplified Victorian kitchen. Like the stove tucked in to an alcove that looks suspiciously like an old fireplace.

Simplified Victorian kitchen. Like the stove tucked in to an alcove that looks suspiciously like an old fireplace.

Burnt Island Lighthouse--15 minute boat ride to and from the island and 2.5 hours on the island with a tour of the lighthouse give by the lighthouse keeper.

Burnt Island Lighthouse--15 minute boat ride to and from the island and 2.5 hours on the island with a tour of the lighthouse give by the lighthouse keeper.

Panoramio - Photo of Burnt Island Lighthouse - Boothbay Harbor, Maine

Panoramio - Photo of Burnt Island Lighthouse - Boothbay Harbor, Maine

Boothbay Harbor, Maine-Burnt Island Light Station - Boothbay Harbor - Reviews of Burnt Island Light Station - TripAdvisor

Boothbay Harbor, Maine-Burnt Island Light Station - Boothbay Harbor - Reviews of Burnt Island Light Station - TripAdvisor

November 29, 1875 – “Heavy gale of wind with snow squalls from the northwest came on early in the morning. Wind continues blowing fearfully all through the night and very cold. Much vapor flying. Schooner James Somes of Portland while trying to work into the harbor under very short sail was capsized between the light and Tumbler Island and sank in ten fathoms of water. The captain was drowned, the rest, four in number, were saved by boats coming from the windward. Could not board her from…

November 29, 1875 – “Heavy gale of wind with snow squalls from the northwest came on early in the morning. Wind continues blowing fearfully all through the night and very cold. Much vapor flying. Schooner James Somes of Portland while trying to work into the harbor under very short sail was capsized between the light and Tumbler Island and sank in ten fathoms of water. The captain was drowned, the rest, four in number, were saved by boats coming from the windward. Could not board her from…

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