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Cathay Williams - Became the first and the only known female Buffalo Soldier. Enlisting in the US Regular Army 1866 at St. Louis, Missouri for a three year engagement, passing herself off as a man. She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay.

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from Civil War Saga

Who Were the Buffalo Soldiers?

Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The nickname was given to the "Negro Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought; the term eventually became synonymous with all of the African-American regiments formed in 1866. "Buffalo Soldiers" were established by Congress as the first peacetime all-black regiments in the regular U.S. Army.

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from BBC News

Bob Marley: Coolest dad at my prep school

Jamaican musicians Bob & Rita Marley and family. -Jamaican families are tightly woven together like a knit. If you are unkind to one member of the family, the rest of the family empathizes. Even though a child may embark on a new life as a wife or husband, the families still preside over their interests and well-being.

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Comanche family, early 1900s from the Comanche Nation located in southwestern Oklahoma. The elder man in Comanche traditional clothing is Ta-Ten-e-quer. His wife, Ta-Tat-ty, also wears Comanche clothing. Their niece (center) is Wife-per, also known as Frances E. Wright. Her father was a Buffalo Soldier (an Afro American cavalryman) who deserted and married into the Comanches. Henry (center left) and Lorenzano (center right) are the sons of Frances, who married an Afro American man.

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Private Cathay Williams was the only woman to serve in the U.S. Army as a Buffalo Soldier. On November 15, 1866 she enlisted in the Army as a man. Williams reversed her name William Cathay and lived as a male soldier and served until she was found out due to the last of many illnesses she suffered while serving. She is the only documented black woman known to have served in the Army during these times when enlisting women was prohibited.

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