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Who Were the Buffalo Soldiers?

Buffalo Soldiers originally were members of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army, formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The nickname was given to the "Negro Cavalry" by the Native American tribes they fought; the term eventually became synonymous with all of the African-American regiments formed in 1866. "Buffalo Soldiers" were established by Congress as the first peacetime all-black regiments in the regular U.S. Army.

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A Corporal from the U.S. Cavalry Regiment (standing far left) and three unidentified Apache scouts - circa 1885

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I don't dig these shoes, never did, never will, even if it was the year 5761

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Bob Marley: Coolest dad at my prep school

Jamaican musicians Bob & Rita Marley and family. -Jamaican families are tightly woven together like a knit. If you are unkind to one member of the family, the rest of the family empathizes. Even though a child may embark on a new life as a wife or husband, the families still preside over their interests and well-being.

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Buffalo Soldiers were members of an all-black regiment in the U.S. Army. The 10th Cavalry was formed on September 21, 1866 at Fort Leavenworth and was the regiment that the Native Americans first called "buffalo soldiers."

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Cathay Williams - Became the first and the only known female Buffalo Soldier. Enlisting in the US Regular Army 1866 at St. Louis, Missouri for a three year engagement, passing herself off as a man. She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay.

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Lieutenant Colonel Charles Young. The first African American to attain the rank of Colonel in the United States Army and it's highest ranking African American until the day he died. A true Buffalo Soldier...

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History of the Buffalo Soldiers

Black cowboys of the late 1800s. From the plantations of the South to the plains of Texas, black cowboys made their mark on the subduing of the vast western territories, keeping the peace with indigenous peoples, "putting out fires" as buffalo soldiers sent to hot spots, and later as cowboys in America's cattle industry and -- gaining fame and glory in the rodeos.

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