The broken window theory was developed in the 1960’s by Philip Zimbardo, a Stanford psychologist. It’s simply a theory that states one bad thing attracts more bad things to happen. And you know what? I believe we have our own broken windows. When you have something unfinished in your life it excuses more of the same happening. Learn more about this from my blog! Original Photo: Flickr | Damien Ayers

The broken window theory was developed in the 1960’s by Philip Zimbardo, a Stanford psychologist. It’s simply a theory that states one bad thing attracts more bad things to happen. And you know what? I believe we have our own broken windows. When you have something unfinished in your life it excuses more of the same happening. Learn more about this from my blog! Original Photo: Flickr | Damien Ayers

In criminology, the broken windows theory is based on the 1982 work of political scientist Dr. James Q. Wilson and American criminologist Dr. George L. Kelling. Wilson and Kelling (1982) theory imp…

In criminology, the broken windows theory is based on the 1982 work of political scientist Dr. James Q. Wilson and American criminologist Dr. George L. Kelling. Wilson and Kelling (1982) theory imp…

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Broken windows theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Broken windows theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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