Civic & Government: The Bill of Rights: Debating the Amendments Lesson Plan from the Library of Congress. In the lesson, students examine a copy of twelve possible amendments to the United States Constitution as originally sent to the states for their ratification in September of 1789. Students debate and vote on which of these amendments they would ratify and compare their resulting “Bill of Rights” to the ten amendments ratified by ten states that have since been known by this name.

Civic & Government: The Bill of Rights: Debating the Amendments Lesson Plan from the Library of Congress. In the lesson, students examine a copy of twelve possible amendments to the United States Constitution as originally sent to the states for their ratification in September of 1789. Students debate and vote on which of these amendments they would ratify and compare their resulting “Bill of Rights” to the ten amendments ratified by ten states that have since been known by this name.

George Mason, Father of the Bill of Rights | He refused to sign the Constitution without a Bill of Rights to secure the people's liberty. He secured an agreement that a Bill of Rights would immediately be considered after the Constitution was ratified.

George Mason, Father of the Bill of Rights | He refused to sign the Constitution without a Bill of Rights to secure the people's liberty. He secured an agreement that a Bill of Rights would immediately be considered after the Constitution was ratified.

The Fourth Amendment - " The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."  Passed by Congress September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The first 10 amendments form the Bill of Rights.

The Fourth Amendment - " The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Passed by Congress September 25, 1789. Ratified December 15, 1791. The first 10 amendments form the Bill of Rights.

Personal Bill Of Rights Photo:  This Photo was uploaded by Chathouse. Find other Personal Bill Of Rights pictures and photos or upload your own with Phot...

Personal Bill Of Rights Photo: This Photo was uploaded by Chathouse. Find other Personal Bill Of Rights pictures and photos or upload your own with Phot...

Bill of Rights of the United States of America (1791) Download a PDF of the Bill of Rights The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Written by James Madison in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties, the Bill of Rights lists specific …

Bill of Rights of the United States of America (1791) Download a PDF of the Bill of Rights The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Written by James Madison in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties, the Bill of Rights lists specific …

Bill of Rights of the United States of America (1791) Download a PDF of the Bill of Rights The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Written by James Madison in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties, the Bill of Rights lists specific …

Bill of Rights of the United States of America (1791) Download a PDF of the Bill of Rights The first 10 amendments to the Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. Written by James Madison in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties, the Bill of Rights lists specific …

In responding to its critics, PayPal gives what at first sounds a reasonable response. ‘We believe that the Internet empowers authors in a way that is positive and points to an even brighter future for writers, artists and creators the world over…’ But if that makes it sound like PayPal are for freedom of speech, here’s how the rest of that sentence from their blog continues … ‘but we draw the line at certain adult content that is extreme or potentially illegal.’

In responding to its critics, PayPal gives what at first sounds a reasonable response. ‘We believe that the Internet empowers authors in a way that is positive and points to an even brighter future for writers, artists and creators the world over…’ But if that makes it sound like PayPal are for freedom of speech, here’s how the rest of that sentence from their blog continues … ‘but we draw the line at certain adult content that is extreme or potentially illegal.’

Challenge your students to apply the Bill of Rights with current issues, political cartoons, images and court cases. This product will give you multiple scenarios to review and apply the Bill of Rights with your students! All of these scenarios will help your students prepare for any test or quiz on the Bill of Rights. Give your students a scenario card and see if they can identify which amendment applies to the political cartoon, image or court case.

Bill of Rights Scenarios Games and Review

Challenge your students to apply the Bill of Rights with current issues, political cartoons, images and court cases. This product will give you multiple scenarios to review and apply the Bill of Rights with your students! All of these scenarios will help your students prepare for any test or quiz on the Bill of Rights. Give your students a scenario card and see if they can identify which amendment applies to the political cartoon, image or court case.

Students will enjoy learning the U.S. Constitution Bill of Rights with this matching activity.  Using a pocket chart, magnets on a whiteboard, baskets, or just a desk, students will match the amendment number with its substance.  This activity provides great hands-on memory practice. ---> Watch this video HERE to see ideas on how to use this activity.What You Get:- 10 Amendment Word Cards.- 10 Amendment Matching Kid Cards- 10 Amendment Strip Cards- 1 Bill of Rights PosterSAVE!!

Bill of Rights | Match & Learn Activity

Students will enjoy learning the U.S. Constitution Bill of Rights with this matching activity. Using a pocket chart, magnets on a whiteboard, baskets, or just a desk, students will match the amendment number with its substance. This activity provides great hands-on memory practice. ---> Watch this video HERE to see ideas on how to use this activity.What You Get:- 10 Amendment Word Cards.- 10 Amendment Matching Kid Cards- 10 Amendment Strip Cards- 1 Bill of Rights PosterSAVE!!

This Common Core reading and social studies activity is interesting and thought-provoking for students. Students will work in a cooperative group to examine scenarios with realistic people. They will decide if the person's rights were respected, according to the Bill of Rights. Students are also asked to correlate the scenario to an Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

Bill of Rights in Everyday Life

This Common Core reading and social studies activity is interesting and thought-provoking for students. Students will work in a cooperative group to examine scenarios with realistic people. They will decide if the person's rights were respected, according to the Bill of Rights. Students are also asked to correlate the scenario to an Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

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