"Fate goes as she must.“ Favorite quote from Beowulf, Seamus Heaney's translation. #quotation #english lit

"Fate goes as she must.“ Favorite quote from Beowulf, Seamus Heaney's translation. #quotation #english lit

I chose this because this is something that Beowulf lived by. He wanted glory and to have fame while he was alive and long after he died.

I chose this because this is something that Beowulf lived by. He wanted glory and to have fame while he was alive and long after he died.

We men are the monsters now, the time of heroes is dead, Wiglaf - The Christ God has killed it, leaving humankind with nothing but weeping martyrs, fear and shame. - Beowulf. Viking quote.

We men are the monsters now, the time of heroes is dead, Wiglaf - The Christ God has killed it, leaving humankind with nothing but weeping martyrs, fear and shame. - Beowulf. Viking quote.

The Literature Project - loads of e-books available for free download - how can you go wrong with a site that offers you The Canterbury Tales and Beowulf?  Wish they were free when I was getting my first degree...

The Literature Project - loads of e-books available for free download - how can you go wrong with a site that offers you The Canterbury Tales and Beowulf? Wish they were free when I was getting my first degree...

A quote from Beowulf. We did not read this part, but this is a motif of Beowulf. This gives a life lesson for all. Be on your best behavior and you too can be a hero.

A quote from Beowulf. We did not read this part, but this is a motif of Beowulf. This gives a life lesson for all. Be on your best behavior and you too can be a hero.

This is a wonderful word with stirring origins. Nothing to do with the utensil you use to stir your tea, spoondrift is derived from the old Scots word ‘spoon’ which meant ‘to run before the wind’ while drift may come from the Old Norse ‘drift’, like snowdrift.

This is a wonderful word with stirring origins. Nothing to do with the utensil you use to stir your tea, spoondrift is derived from the old Scots word ‘spoon’ which meant ‘to run before the wind’ while drift may come from the Old Norse ‘drift’, like snowdrift.

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