Tombstone for Stonewall Jackson's left arm.  Jackson was shot during the Battle of Chancellorsville near Fredericksburg, Virginia, and the arm was amputated.

An unusual headstone. It marks the burial spot of Confederate General, Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson's left arm. It was amputated after a friendly-fire incident during the Battle of Chancellorsville in the American Civil War.

Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville | ... the Battle of Chancellorsville. (AP Photo/Library of Congress

The Pennsylvania Infantry camp on Belle Plain, Virginia, is pictured in March three weeks before the Battle of Chancellorsville. (AP Photo/Library of Congress) The Civil War, Part The Places - In Focus - The Atlantic

Wounded soldiers being tended in the field after the Battle of Chancellorsville near Fredericksburg, Va., May 2, 1863.

New York Medical - Wounded Soldiers Being Tended in the Field After the Battle of Chancellorsville - Near Fredericksburg, VA, May 1863

"Old Glory - American Flag - USA" ~ This is a great photo that was taken during the Civil  War Reenactment - Battle of Chancellorsville in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on May 4, 2008.

"Old Glory - American Flag - USA" ~ This is a great photo that was taken during the Civil War Reenactment - Battle of Chancellorsville in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on May

Chancellorsville, Battle of [Credit: MPI/Hulton Archive/Getty Images]

A Glorious Army: Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days to Gettysburg, by Jeffry D.

Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson arrived at West Point unprepared and uneducated. He failed his first entrance exam. A loner, he worked diligently to improve his class ranking and graduated 17th. in the Class of 1846. His worst grades, like U.S. Grant's, in infantry tactics.

Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May The general survived with the loss of an arm to amputation, but died of complications from pneumonia eight days later.

Corporal G.H. Swift, Company C, 18th Massachusetts, was injured at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. on May 3, 1863, when a musket ball fractured the top of his skull. Surgeons attempted to trephine the wound but halted the procedure upon discovering that the inner surface of the skull was not fractured. Corporal Swift died on May 17.

Corporal G. Swift, Company C, Massachusetts, was injured at the battle of Chancellorsville, Va. on May when a musket ball fractured the top of his skull. Surgeons attempted to trephine the wound but halted the procedure upon discovering th

Lee's Greatest Victory: The Battle of Chancellorsville: Lieutenant General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

Lee's Greatest Victory: The Battle of Chancellorsville

Lee's Greatest Victory: The Battle of Chancellorsville: Lieutenant General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

While the Battle of Chancellorsville was Robert E. Lee’s greatest victory, it was the beginning of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s ultimate defeat. On May 2,

While the Battle of Chancellorsville was Robert E. Lee’s greatest victory, it was the beginning of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s ultimate defeat. On May 2,

Confederate Dead Behind the Stone Wall of Marye's Heights, Killed During the Battle of Chancellorsville - Fredericksburg, VA, May 1863

Confederate dead behind stone wall of Mary's Heights Fredericksburg VA killed during Battle of Chancellorsville May 1863

Ruins of Chancellorsville

Extensive Battle of Chancellorsville Resources for the Serious Student of the Civil War

General Jubal Anderson Early   Battle of Chancellorsville  A lawyer and Confederate general during the U.S. Civil War, who wrote Lost Cause postbellum and continued to voice his views in favor of the former Confederate States of America.

General Jubal Anderson Early Battle of Chancellorsville A lawyer and Confederate general during the U. Civil War, who wrote Lost Cause postbellum and continued to voice his views in favor of the former Confederate States of America.

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