“As long as I kept moving, my grief streamed out behind me like a swimmer's long hair in water. I knew the weight was there but it didn't touch me. Only when I stopped did the slick, dark stuff of it come floating around my face, catching my arms and throat till I began to drown. So I just didn't stop.”  ― Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

“As long as I kept moving, my grief streamed out behind me like a swimmer's long hair in water. I knew the weight was there but it didn't touch me. Only when I stopped did the slick, dark stuff of it come floating around my face, catching my arms and throat till I began to drown. So I just didn't stop.” ― Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Flight Behaviour Barbara Kingslover "He was so many things, this Mr Byron, that he constituted something if an audience, driving her to invent a performance on the spot"

Barbara Kingsolver: 'Motherhood is so sentimentalised in our culture'

Flight Behaviour Barbara Kingslover "He was so many things, this Mr Byron, that he constituted something if an audience, driving her to invent a performance on the spot"

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver on Book of the Month

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver on Book of the Month

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver — Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists | Goodreads

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver — Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists | Goodreads

This beautiful passage comes from Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible, a fictional account of an American missionary family in the Belgian Congo. The novel was a 1999 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

This beautiful passage comes from Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible, a fictional account of an American missionary family in the Belgian Congo. The novel was a 1999 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

Author Barbara Kingsolver and her family abandoned the industrial-food pipeline to live a rural life—vowing that, for one year, they’d only buy food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is an enthralling narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.

Author Barbara Kingsolver and her family abandoned the industrial-food pipeline to live a rural life—vowing that, for one year, they’d only buy food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is an enthralling narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.

Pinterest
Search