Part II. Attila the Hun (c.403? - 453 AD) He was brought up as a barbarian hostage at the court of the emperor Honorius. Attila knew the Roman world. On several occasions he assaulted the Roman Empire. In 451, Flavius Aetius defeated Attila and the Huns at the Battle of Chalons. In 453 Attila died from a burst blood vessel; the Hun Empire collapsed.

Part II. Attila the Hun (c.403? - 453 AD) He was brought up as a barbarian hostage at the court of the emperor Honorius. Attila knew the Roman world. On several occasions he assaulted the Roman Empire. In 451, Flavius Aetius defeated Attila and the Huns at the Battle of Chalons. In 453 Attila died from a burst blood vessel; the Hun Empire collapsed.

Attila the Hun (R. over the Huns from 434-453). With his brother Bleda, Attila succeeded his uncle, and became sole king in 445. Attila was the scourge of both the Eastern and Western halves of the Roman Empire. Told the Romans he would leave them alone if they paid enough gold; invaded when they didn’t. Invaded Italy after Honoria begged for his help getting out of an unwanted marriage, claiming he was now betrothed to the princess.  Died shortly thereafter.

Attila the Hun (R. over the Huns from 434-453). With his brother Bleda, Attila succeeded his uncle, and became sole king in 445. Attila was the scourge of both the Eastern and Western halves of the Roman Empire. Told the Romans he would leave them alone if they paid enough gold; invaded when they didn’t. Invaded Italy after Honoria begged for his help getting out of an unwanted marriage, claiming he was now betrothed to the princess. Died shortly thereafter.

Nice things to say about Attila the Hun...interesting article

Nice Things to Say About Attila the Hun

ATTILA THE HUN... The Dothraki in Game of Thrones were also partially based on the Huns

ATTILA THE HUN... The Dothraki in Game of Thrones were also partially based on the Huns

Attila the Hun by LocascioDesigns.deviantart.com on @deviantART  Too bad the artist did not read up on history.  The Huns never had horns on their helmet, nor did they go to battle half naked. Taking booty was a universal practice of armies.  Scalps proved valor.  Cut off heads would have been a hindrance for fast moving armies.

Attila the Hun by LocascioDesigns.deviantart.com on @deviantART Too bad the artist did not read up on history. The Huns never had horns on their helmet, nor did they go to battle half naked. Taking booty was a universal practice of armies. Scalps proved valor. Cut off heads would have been a hindrance for fast moving armies.

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