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The story behind the name "Arkansas" ~ According to the Arkansas Secretary of State's website, the Quapaws were known as the "downstream people" by some tribes, and the Algonkian-speaking Indians of the Ohio Valley called them the Arkansas, or "south wind." Their pronunciation of the name was "Oo-ka-na-sa," according to Arkansas Tech University. There were many different spellings & pronunciations mixing French, Quapaw, Algonkian, and ultimately English. In 1881, the Legislature passed a…

Arkansas governor calls for changes to controversial 'religious freedom' bill

Arkansas governor calls for changes to controversial 'religiousProtesters condemn Arkansas’ religious freedom bill. Jessica Glenza in Los Angeles @JessicaGlenza The governor of Arkansas says he wants the state’s legislature to recall a “religious freedom” bill sent to his desk on Tuesday following a national uproar over the legislation, the second time this week a US governor has faced a backlash to laws that opponents say permit discrimination against gay people.

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Arkansas Legislature Passes Bill Allowing LGBT Discrimination

Arkansas Legislature Copies Indiana, Passes Controversial Religious Freedom Bill

WASHINGTON -- Arkansas passed a religious freedom bill on Tuesday that is similar to an Indiana law that has faced national backlash for legalizing discr...

James Sanders Hudson, son of Jesse Hudson and Matilda Everett Hudson, was born 12-15-1842 on George's Creek west of Yellville, AR (Marion County). He served as a Confederate soldier in the Civil War under General Sterling Price. He was granted a pension by a Special Act of the Arkansas Legislature for service in the Confederate Army. About 1865, he married Eliza Elizabeth Thomason, daughter of pioneer Henry Thomason.https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Hudson-5186

While Indiana Wants a Fix to “Religious Freedom” Law, Arkansas’ Legislature Sends Similar Bill to Governor’s Desk

The incentives built into Mike Pence’s Medicaid scheme almost guarantee poor Hoosiers will become permanent dependents on Indiana’s expanding welfare.