The 7th century gold belt buckle found at Sutton Hoo ship burial, near Woodbridge, in the English county of Suffolk.

The 7th century gold belt buckle found at Sutton Hoo ship burial, near Woodbridge, in the English county of Suffolk.

RULERS OF THE SOUTH SAXONS | CONTENTS, THE HYPOTHESIS, KEY DATES, SAXON DRESS

RULERS OF THE SOUTH SAXONS | CONTENTS, THE HYPOTHESIS, KEY DATES, SAXON DRESS

Gold and enamel Anglo-Saxon roundel: gold tray inlaid with cloisonne enamel; depicting the right Hand of God in opaque white enamel. Late 10th/early 11th Century - found by an armature metal detectorist in Hampshire, England and currently housed in the British Museum.

Gold and enamel Anglo-Saxon roundel: gold tray inlaid with cloisonne enamel; depicting the right Hand of God in opaque white enamel. Late 10th/early 11th Century - found by an armature metal detectorist in Hampshire, England and currently housed in the British Museum.

So my fascination with History leads me to explore how our Queen is related to…

So my fascination with History leads me to explore how our Queen is related to…

Alfred The Great, King of Wessex AD 871. He was a remarkable and pious man who brought a new order to the Kingdom following his defeat of the Danes. His son built New Minster at Winchester as a family mausoleum to house his tomb.

Alfred The Great, King of Wessex AD 871. He was a remarkable and pious man who brought a new order to the Kingdom following his defeat of the Danes. His son built New Minster at Winchester as a family mausoleum to house his tomb.

Cuddesdon Bowl: Anglo-Saxon glass bowl from Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire. This early seventh-century Anglo-Saxon bowl, probably made in Kent, was discovered in 1847 in Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire. It was found in the grave of an Anglo-Saxon of noble rank, during alterations to the Bishop of Oxford’s palace. The bowl subsequently went missing and was re-discovered in 1971 in a house in Leicestershire, where it was being used as flower vase.

Cuddesdon Bowl: Anglo-Saxon glass bowl from Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire. This early seventh-century Anglo-Saxon bowl, probably made in Kent, was discovered in 1847 in Cuddesdon, Oxfordshire. It was found in the grave of an Anglo-Saxon of noble rank, during alterations to the Bishop of Oxford’s palace. The bowl subsequently went missing and was re-discovered in 1971 in a house in Leicestershire, where it was being used as flower vase.

West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village 1/6    The oldest house, built on the site of the original building, with the Hall in the background. All the buildings are experimental reconstructions built to test different interpretations of the archaeological evidence.

West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village 1/6 The oldest house, built on the site of the original building, with the Hall in the background. All the buildings are experimental reconstructions built to test different interpretations of the archaeological evidence.

English Historical Fiction Authors: Richard the Lionheart and the Women of Jerusalem

English Historical Fiction Authors: Richard the Lionheart and the Women of Jerusalem

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