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At 21, Ota Benga was brought to the United States by African explorer Samuel Verner. Verner displayed Ota Benga alongside six other pygmies of the Congolese Mbuti tribe at the St. Louis World Fair in 1904. Verner then escorted them back to the Congo, but Benga returned to America for the second time and ended up on display at the Bronx Zoo. He then studied at a colored orphan asylum and attended a Baptist Seminary. But only the forest held his attention and he ultimately took his own life.

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Apartheid South Africa

The era of apartheid in South Africa is infamous for its utter genocidal dehumanization, deportation, impoverishment and all-around discrimination against a native population by Afrikaners. Apartheid lasted for over 40 years with the support of the United States and other world powers

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An Infographic illustrating the African slave trade in American history. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “African American Slave Trade: Ships  Records for Genealogy.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/african-american-slave-trade-ships-records-for-genealogy.html

An Infographic illustrating the African slave trade in American history. Read more on the GenealogyBank blog: “African American Slave Trade: Ships Records for Genealogy.” http://blog.genealogybank.com/african-american-slave-trade-ships-records-for-genealogy.html

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Ana Nzinga Mbande, a fearless African Queen .......Queen Nzinga Mbande was a ruthless and powerful 17th century African ruler of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms (modern-day Angola). Nzinga fearlessly and cleverly fought for the freedom and stature of her kingdoms against the Portuguese, who were colonizing the area at the time.