Racism history for African Americans in a quick picture. The picture shows what…

Racism history for African Americans in a quick picture. The picture shows what…

Today in Black History, 8/3/2013 - Joan Elizabeth Higginbotham was the third African American woman to go into space in 2006. For more info, check out today's notes!

Taking Flight: 7 Black Female Astronauts and Aviators Who Changed History

Today in Black History, 8/3/2013 - Joan Elizabeth Higginbotham was the third African American woman to go into space in 2006. For more info, check out today's notes!

One of the most suppressed and hidden stories of African and African American history is the story of the 1811 Slave Revolt in Louisiana. Over 500 Africans, from 50 different nations with 50 different languages, would wage a fight against U.S. troops and the territorial militias. The revolt was put down by Jan. 11. The leaders were captured, placed on trial and later executed. Their heads were cut off and placed on spikes that stretched over 60 miles. Click for story

One of the most suppressed and hidden stories of African and African American history is the story of the 1811 Slave Revolt in Louisiana. Over 500 Africans, from 50 different nations with 50 different languages, would wage a fight against U.S. troops and the territorial militias. The revolt was put down by Jan. 11. The leaders were captured, placed on trial and later executed. Their heads were cut off and placed on spikes that stretched over 60 miles. Click for story

Dr. Georgia Rooks Dwelle (1884-1977)   the daughter of a slave, was the first Spelman College graduate to attend medical school ultimately graduate with honors from Meharry Medical College in Nashville. Upon moving back to Atlanta  she opened the Dwelle Infirmary, which was the first general hospital for African-Americans, the first "lying-in" obstetrical hospital for African-American women.

Dr. Georgia Rooks Dwelle (1884-1977) the daughter of a slave, was the first Spelman College graduate to attend medical school ultimately graduate with honors from Meharry Medical College in Nashville. Upon moving back to Atlanta she opened the Dwelle Infirmary, which was the first general hospital for African-Americans, the first "lying-in" obstetrical hospital for African-American women.

#SelmaBurke. ❤ Brilliant artist. It's up to us, those who not only care, but revere this quiet extraordinary history, to be its curators for posterity. -m

#SelmaBurke. ❤ Brilliant artist. It's up to us, those who not only care, but revere this quiet extraordinary history, to be its curators for posterity. -m

NASA's first African-American manager.  Dorothy Johnson Vaughan (1910–2008) was an African American mathematician who worked at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the predecessor agency to NASA. Prior to arriving at NACA's Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in 1943.

NASA's first African-American manager. Dorothy Johnson Vaughan (1910–2008) was an African American mathematician who worked at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the predecessor agency to NASA. Prior to arriving at NACA's Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in 1943.

African American Art African wall Art African Woman by iQstudio #africa #art #blackart

African American Art, African wall Art Decor, African Woman, African Art painting, Black Woman Painting, Black Woman

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon.  McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed.

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed.

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