#SelmaBurke. ❤ Brilliant artist. It's up to us, those who not only care, but revere this quiet extraordinary history, to be its curators for posterity. -m

#SelmaBurke. ❤ Brilliant artist. It's up to us, those who not only care, but revere this quiet extraordinary history, to be its curators for posterity. -m

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots  - Marcus Garvey..."love this quote"

A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots - Marcus Garvey..."love this quote"

The National Museum of African American History and Culture - THE BLACK POWER SALUTE Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised black-gloved fists when the United States national anthem was played during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture - THE BLACK POWER SALUTE Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised black-gloved fists when the United States national anthem was played during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

Bravest of the brave: U.S. Marshals escorting Ruby Bridges, one of the first African Americans students to attend a white school. by batjas88

Bravest of the brave: U.S. Marshals escorting Ruby Bridges, one of the first African Americans students to attend a white school. by batjas88

History, this is FANTASTIC i wish i could hang this on my wall, what an amazing reminder of just how short black history is, and how far we have to go

History, this is FANTASTIC i wish i could hang this on my wall, what an amazing reminder of just how short black history is, and how far we have to go

In 1952, Ruby McCollum, the wealthiest African-American woman in Live Oak, murdered the town’s beloved doctor, a white man named Leroy Adams.  She said it was the only way she knew to end six years of rape.  The case would help show that a persistent form of bondage plagued the South for a century after the Civil War — “paramour rights,” the assumption that white men had a right to use African-American women for sex.

In 1952, Ruby McCollum, the wealthiest African-American woman in Live Oak, murdered the town’s beloved doctor, a white man named Leroy Adams. She said it was the only way she knew to end six years of rape. The case would help show that a persistent form of bondage plagued the South for a century after the Civil War — “paramour rights,” the assumption that white men had a right to use African-American women for sex.

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