The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

How cold is the coldest place in the Universe, that we know of? What's the lowest man-made temperature ever achieved? And just how many zeroes are needed to express 'absolute hot', after which the fundamentals of conventional physics start to break...

Physicists prove that it's impossible to cool an object to absolute zero

Physicists prove that it's impossible to cool an object to absolute zero

Robert Boyle pioneered the idea of an absolute zero. The zero point of any thermodynamic temperature scale, such as Kelvin or Rankine, is set at absolute zero. By international agreement, absolute zero is defined as 0K on the Kelvin scale and as −273.15° on the Celsius scale. This equates to  0 R on the Rankine scale. Scientists have achieved temperatures very close to absolute zero, where matter exhibits quantum effects such as superconductivity and superfluidity.

Robert Boyle pioneered the idea of an absolute zero. The zero point of any thermodynamic temperature scale, such as Kelvin or Rankine, is set at absolute zero. By international agreement, absolute zero is defined as 0K on the Kelvin scale and as −273.15° on the Celsius scale. This equates to 0 R on the Rankine scale. Scientists have achieved temperatures very close to absolute zero, where matter exhibits quantum effects such as superconductivity and superfluidity.

Absolute Zero [CD], 22009432

Absolute Zero [CD]

Absolute Zero [CD], 22009432

Absolute Zero [LP] - Vinyl, 19961033

Absolute Zero [LP] - Vinyl

Absolute Zero [LP] - Vinyl, 19961033

Online games offer trove of brain data. Study of 35 million users of brain-training software finds alcohol and sleep linked to cognitive performance.

Online games offer trove of brain data. Study of 35 million users of brain-training software finds alcohol and sleep linked to cognitive performance.

Nova: Absolute Zero [DVD] [English] [2007]

Nova: Absolute Zero [DVD] [English] [2007]

When an object is heated, its atoms can move with different levels of energy, from low to high. With positive temperatures (blue), atoms more likely occupy low-energy states than high-energy states, while the opposite is true for negative temperatures (red).

Atoms Reach Record Temperature, Colder than Absolute Zero

When an object is heated, its atoms can move with different levels of energy, from low to high. With positive temperatures (blue), atoms more likely occupy low-energy states than high-energy states, while the opposite is true for negative temperatures (red).

Pinterest
Search