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The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

How cold is the coldest place in the Universe, that we know of? What's the lowest man-made temperature ever achieved? And just how many zeroes are needed to express 'absolute hot', after which the fundamentals of conventional physics start to break...

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My kind of page layout: it lets the typography and photography speak for itself. There is absolutely zero clutter. // Ausenco by Chris Maclean

My kind of page layout: it lets the typography and photography speak for itself. There is absolutely zero clutter. // Ausenco by Chris Maclean

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19 Hilarious Tweets That Prove Kids Give Absolutely Zero Fucks

19%20Hilarious%20Tweets%20That%20Prove%20Kids%20Give%20Absolutely%20Zero%20Fucks

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Robert Boyle pioneered the idea of an absolute zero. The zero point of any thermodynamic temperature scale, such as Kelvin or Rankine, is set at absolute zero. By international agreement, absolute zero is defined as 0K on the Kelvin scale and as −273.15° on the Celsius scale. This equates to 0 R on the Rankine scale. Scientists have achieved temperatures very close to absolute zero, where matter exhibits quantum effects such as superconductivity and superfluidity.

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Because you are a survivor of the unfairness of life. You are stronger than you think. And you are capable of achieving far more than you believe. Excerpt from: Life isn't fair

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19 Tumblr Posts About "Harry Potter" That Will Make Your Day

Viktor Krum having absolutely zero chill | 19 Tumblr Posts About "Harry Potter" That Will Make Your Day

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Absolute zero is no longer absolute zero

Absolute zero is no longer absolute zero. Scientists have rewritten the known laws of physics after hitting a temperature lower than absolute zero. Physicists at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Germany created a quantum gas using potassium atoms, fixing them in a standard lattice group using magnetic fields and lasers.