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The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics
from io9

The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

How cold is the coldest place in the Universe, that we know of? What's the lowest man-made temperature ever achieved? And just how many zeroes are needed to express 'absolute hot', after which the fundamentals of conventional physics start to break...

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My kind of page layout: it lets the typography and photography speak for itself. There is absolutely zero clutter. // Ausenco by Chris Maclean

My kind of page layout: it lets the typography and photography speak for itself. There is absolutely zero clutter. // Ausenco by Chris Maclean

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The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics
from io9

The Hottest And Coldest Temperatures Allowed By Conventional Physics

How cold is the coldest place in the Universe, that we know of? What's the lowest man-made temperature ever achieved? And just how many zeroes are needed to express 'absolute hot', after which the fundamentals of conventional physics start to break...

Cooling down electrons close to absolute zero has given us new perspective on how the world behaves at the smallest of scales. This could be the gateway to gaining greater understanding and perhaps even mastery of superconductivity.

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Please someone give me a sign or point me to the path I'm supposed to take! Never been so completely torn or confused in my whole life

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from The Verge

Absolute zero is no longer absolute zero

Absolute zero is no longer absolute zero. Scientists have rewritten the known laws of physics after hitting a temperature lower than absolute zero. Physicists at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Germany created a quantum gas using potassium atoms, fixing them in a standard lattice group using magnetic fields and lasers.

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A Billion Degrees of Separation: TEMPERATURE - From absolute zero to 'absolute hot'
from BBC

Infographic: Absolute zero to ‘absolute hot’

A Billion Degrees of Separation: TEMPERATURE - From absolute zero to 'absolute hot'