Queer(y)ing the Curator's Role

Acknowledging Birchall’s understanding on how the role of activist artists has become integral to contemporary curatorial strategies, the chapter investigates the role of the curator within the dissemination of art activism. The board shows how the chapter intends to discuss and offer insight into Brenson’s assertion that the curator is no longer “a behind-the-scenes aesthetic arbiter… [but a] central player in the broader stage of global cultural politics”.
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Atkins criticises curators Rinder and Blake of the Berkeley Art Museum 1996 “In a Different Light,” as well as Art in America’s “After Stonewall". The author yearns for Cotter’s response to Steers’ observation that "gay art is a marketing label ... it’s important to discuss it and expose the fallacy of lumping us all together."

Atkins criticises curators Rinder and Blake of the Berkeley Art Museum 1996 “In a Different Light,” as well as Art in America’s “After Stonewall". The author yearns for Cotter’s response to Steers’ observation that "gay art is a marketing label ... it’s important to discuss it and expose the fallacy of lumping us all together."

The book examines divergent and fresh types of curatorial practice and how curators are ‘transcending boundaries’ in order to open up new possibilities for art itself.

What makes a curator? An insight into how to archive digital creativity.

Progression in curatorial and museological practices postulate that museum or gallery audience interactions should be an exchange and interactive contribution where “[it is] less like that of the isolated [art] object and more like that of the relationship” (Blandy & Congdon, 2004:91).

Progression in curatorial and museological practices postulate that museum or gallery audience interactions should be an exchange and interactive contribution where “[it is] less like that of the isolated [art] object and more like that of the relationship” (Blandy & Congdon, 2004:91).

In "Curatorial Dreams", fourteen authors from disciplines throughout the social sciences and humanities propose exhibitions inspired by their research and critical concerns to creatively put theory into practice.

Curatorial dreams : critics imagine exhibitions (Book, [University of Louisville Libraries]

The position of the "social curator" emerged in the 2000s after a slow process of development. The main curators associated with this practice have become the leaders of museums, galleries and art institutions. However, this process was drastically changed by the authoritarian turn in 2010. The article sketches the history of social curating after the transition and also intends to highlight the possibilities in the current political situation.

The position of the "social curator" emerged in the 2000s after a slow process of development. The main curators associated with this practice have become the leaders of museums, galleries and art institutions. However, this process was drastically changed by the authoritarian turn in 2010. The article sketches the history of social curating after the transition and also intends to highlight the possibilities in the current political situation.

The idea of collective curating is a matter of being able to renounce to what one already knows in order to learn what they do not know – and someone else does. The curatorial approach asks how far can a viewer embrace this attitude and renounce their individual knowledge.

The idea of collective curating is a matter of being able to renounce to what one already knows in order to learn what they do not know – and someone else does. The curatorial approach asks how far can a viewer embrace this attitude and renounce their individual knowledge.

Simons argues that her task as curator is – in curating art activism –  to treat an exhibition like archive and investigate the activism and its documentation prefigure. By looking back over an archive, she states that curators can look forward to the civil partnerships which are established through activist efforts and whose existence will have become established in the present.

Simons argues that her task as curator is – in curating art activism – to treat an exhibition like archive and investigate the activism and its documentation prefigure. By looking back over an archive, she states that curators can look forward to the civil partnerships which are established through activist efforts and whose existence will have become established in the present.

This book starts from this simple premise: thinking the activity of curating. To do that, it distinguishes between 'curating' and 'the curatorial'. If 'curating' is a gamut of professional practices for setting up exhibitions, then 'the curatorial' explores what takes place on the stage set up, both intentionally and unintentionally, by the curator.

Stop curating! And think what curating is all about. This book starts from this simple premise: thinking the activity of curating. To do that, it distinguishes

“How and why do curators choose to exhibit sexually provocative works? How do curators negotiate the challenges of controversy or counter narratives of censorship? How do images of sexuality function and perform in public spaces? What is their power and what is their capacity for transgression? Can such images lead to social change and transformation?”

How and why do curators choose to exhibit sexually provocative works? How do curators negotiate the challenges of controversy, or counter narratives of censo.

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