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The board offers a selection of readings that informed the researcher's thinking on the project and the different aspects tackled in their argument. The selection presented looks broadly at how little attention has been given to Muholi's photographs and how these images function in space, the theoretical underpinnings for the argument and the relationship between art and social activism.
In the context of critical museology, museums are questioning their social role, defining the museum as a site for knowledge exchange and participation in creating links between past and present. Museum education has evolved as a practice in its own right, questioning, expanding and transforming exhibitions and institutions. How does museum work change if we conceive of curating and education as an integrated practice?

In the context of critical museology, museums are questioning their social role, defining the museum as a site for knowledge exchange and participation in creating links between past and present. Museum education has evolved as a practice in its own right, questioning, expanding and transforming exhibitions and institutions. How does museum work change if we conceive of curating and education as an integrated practice?

Artists often see their place to provoke, to voice, to enlighten. The author believes that there is much that is needed to be said, to make people stop, look and listen, to confront social injustice issues. Art can often say what words cannot. We want to bring powerful artwork to the general public that reflects on these issues and encourages change.

Turning Art Into Activism

Women Between Peace and War: Afghanistan. This transportable exhibition can be shown in any school, museum, gallery, or community center anywhere in the world.

Macalik, J., Fraser, J. & McKinley, K. 2015. Introduction to special issue: Discursive space. Curator: The Museum Journal. 58(1):1-3.  Macalick, Fraser and McKinley (2015:1-2) suggest that discursive spaces, in which artists’ practices and outputs reside, can be understood as arenas “that foster negotiation and debate, polarize and politicize space, and invite discussion fraught with contradictory views”.

Introduction to the Special Issue: Discursive Space

Fraser, N. 1990. Rethinking the public sphere: A contribution to the critique of actually existing democracy. Social Text. 25/26:56-80.  Fraser’s (1990:67) assertion that marginalised and disempower groups, like queer communities and activists, can use public spaces and spheres as discursive spaces “to contest and disrupt discourses that inform the dominant discursive formation of the public sphere”.

Fraser, N. 1990. Rethinking the public sphere: A contribution to the critique of actually existing democracy. Social Text. 25/26:56-80. Fraser’s (1990:67) assertion that marginalised and disempower groups, like queer communities and activists, can use public spaces and spheres as discursive spaces “to contest and disrupt discourses that inform the dominant discursive formation of the public sphere”.

"These are artists. So, they were not making throw away statements; instead, they are challenging viewers to spend time with the work and come to a deeper understanding about the human condition. Art has always had the power to change peoples orientation within the world, which is why it has been central to most political movements; and that power lasts beyond the political moment in which the art participated" – Chon Noriega, 2017

The exhibit “Radical Women: Latin American Art, is a sight to see at the Hammer Museum – even the name itself is provocative.

"By unsettling the images and conventions that underpin nationalist representations, racist and colonial mythmaking, and pornographic images... [Muholi's] photographs uncover ways of viewing black women's bodies and sexuality in relation to their agency, choice and independence" (Lewis, 2005:63).

"By unsettling the images and conventions that underpin nationalist representations, racist and colonial mythmaking, and pornographic images... [Muholi's] photographs uncover ways of viewing black women's bodies and sexuality in relation to their agency, choice and independence" (Lewis, 2005:63).

Judith Butler’s Performing Acts and Gender Constitution examines the author’s concept of “gender acts.” According to Butler, gender is not inherent but rather “an identity tenuously constituted in time—an identity instituted through a stylised repetition of acts”. “Gender acts” essentially refers to the way we perform gender; it is not inherent, rather it is constructed.

Judith Butler’s Performing Acts and Gender Constitution examines the author’s concept of “gender acts.” According to Butler, gender is not inherent but rather “an identity tenuously constituted in time—an identity instituted through a stylised repetition of acts”. “Gender acts” essentially refers to the way we perform gender; it is not inherent, rather it is constructed.

This article is concerned chiefly with work by the contemporary South African photographer and activist Zanele Muholi, drawing some comparisons with photographs by Sabelo Mlangeni and Lunga Kama. All of these photographers are concerned with the visibility of sexual minorities, the politics of the gaze, the construction of archives, the role of photography that is activist, and the generation of new ideas about community and citizenship.

This article is concerned chiefly with work by the contemporary South African photographer and activist Zanele Muholi, drawing some comparisons with photographs by Sabelo Mlangeni and Lunga Kama. All of these photographers are concerned with the visibility of sexual minorities, the politics of the gaze, the construction of archives, the role of photography that is activist, and the generation of new ideas about community and citizenship.

McLagen and McKee’s (2012:17) conceptualised methodology of the image-complex into its hermeneutic approach. This methodology contends that readings of aesthetics, political, and social movements are mutually constitutive, and it avoids reductive image-centred analyses which might conceal “the embeddedness of cultural forms in broader [social and political] campaigns” (McLagen & McKee, 2012:17).

Sensible Politics: The Visual Culture of Nongovernmental Activism edited by Meg McLagan and Yates McKee

With Muholi's participation, the exhibition, "queer and trans Art-iculations", explored questions of how sexual and gender categories operate in relation to other socially constructed axes – such as class, race and citizen status – and served as a method to engage the South African public in ways that challenge dominant binary thinking about gender and heteronormativity (Haysom, 2014:2.

With Muholi's participation, the exhibition, "queer and trans Art-iculations", explored questions of how sexual and gender categories operate in relation to other socially constructed axes – such as class, race and citizen status – and served as a method to engage the South African public in ways that challenge dominant binary thinking about gender and heteronormativity (Haysom, 2014:2.

This third title in the Exhibition Histories series examines the numbers shows and follows Lippard’s trajectory as critique and curator, tracing her growing political engagement and involvement with feminism.

From Conceptualism to Feminism: Lucy Lippard’s Numbers Shows

"Photography as Activism" offers a comprehensive theory and history of photography as activism

Photography as Activism: Images for Social Change. I highly recommend this book. It covers a lot of really salient issues as well as goes over major players in this movement of photography.

The book begins, and ends, with a reference to artist and activist Zanele Muholi's photograph entitled ‘Aftermath’. Gunkel uses the photo of a lesbian woman taken 2 days after she was raped, to show how Muholi is commenting on homophobic violence and bearing the "scars of difference". She notes how the act of corrective rape, or rape against lesbians to ‘cure’ them, and the often negative responses to Muholi's work reveal the contested reality of gay rights in contemporary South Africa.

The book begins, and ends, with a reference to artist and activist Zanele Muholi's photograph entitled ‘Aftermath’. Gunkel uses the photo of a lesbian woman taken 2 days after she was raped, to show how Muholi is commenting on homophobic violence and bearing the "scars of difference". She notes how the act of corrective rape, or rape against lesbians to ‘cure’ them, and the often negative responses to Muholi's work reveal the contested reality of gay rights in contemporary South Africa.

"Every Curator’s Handbook" maps every stage of the process of putting on an exhibition from initial idea to final installation.

Every Curator’s Handbook Initiated and edited by Anne Klontz, Karen MacDonald and Yulia Usova in partnership with Perfect Art Institution.