Drug Abuse and Addiction - TFHAW
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This board contains all articles on drug abuse and addiction from the Tools for Health and Wellness website.
Oxycontin

Fentanyl deaths are a Canada-wide 'disaster' Mysterious narcotic is hundreds of times more powerful than heroin Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid painkiller, is estimated to be 80 times as powerful as morphine and hundreds of times more powerful than heroin.

Methamphetamine

Crystal Meth: Methamphetamine (Before and After)

Self-mutilation

Self-mutilation, self-injury or non-suicidal self-harm is the act of deliberate, repetitive, impulsive, non-lethal harming of one’s body.

Drug abuse and addiction

Drug abuse and addiction

Inhalants

Top drug experts have told the Home Office that poppers aren& psychoactive and so wouldn& be covered by the new legal high law.

Cocaine

Inherited Resistance to Cocaine Cocaine-using rat fathers pass epigenetic changes on to their sons that make them resistant to coke addiction.

Rohypnol

Rohypnol

Codependency

Codependence is the excessive emotional or psychological reliance on a partner, frequently one with an illness or addiction who requires support.

Compulsive hoarding

Compulsive hoarding

Compulsive shopping

As with all behavioural addictions, compulsive shopping differs from heavy shopping in that it sits on the other side of a thin grey line in terms of ‘how much is too much?

PCP

Angel Dust [eyn-juhl duhst]- (n.) a common street name for the drug PCP (phencyclidine. It may be ingested orally, smoked, inhaled or injected.

Mandrax

Methaqualone sold as Quaalude was originally synthesized in 1955 as a treatment for malaria but it turned out to be a great anxiolytic and hypnotic, and more important a great time.

LSD

Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), also known as ‘acid’, is the most potent man-made hallucinogenic drug. Just millionth of a gram can cause altered perceptions of reality.

Ketamine

Doctors Are Testing Special K (the drug, not the cereal) as an Instant Depression Remedy

Heroin

Russian drug laws mean addicts in Crimea can no longer receive opioid substitution therapy, driving patients onto the streets and adding to a growing HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe.

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